Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale
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Product Description

Lama Surya Das, the most highly trained American lama in the Tibetan tradition, presents the definitive book on Western Buddhism for the modern-day spiritual seeker.

The radical and compelling message of Buddhism tells us that each of us has the wisdom, awareness, love, and power of the Buddha within; yet most of us are too often like sleeping Buddhas. In Awakening the Buddha Within, Surya Das shows how we can awaken to who we really are in order to lead a more compassionate, enlightened, and balanced life.  It illuminates the guidelines and key principles embodied in the noble Eight-Fold Path and the traditional Three Enlightenment Trainings common to all schools of Buddhism:

Wisdom Training: Developing clear vision, insight, and inner understanding—seeing reality and ourselves as we really are.

Ethics Training: Cultivating virtue, self-discipline, and compassion in what we say and do.

Meditation Training: Practicing mindfulness, concentration, and awareness of the present moment.

With lively stories, meditations, and spiritual practices, Awakening the Buddha Within is an invaluable text for the novice and experienced student of Buddhism alike.

Amazon.com Review

If you dropped the Buddha into a modern metropolis, would he come off sounding like a 16th-century morality play or more like a drive-time disc jockey? Lama Surya Das doesn''t spin platters for a living, but he does have a hip delivery that belies his years of sheltered training in Buddhist monasteries. In Awakening the Buddha Within, he borrows a time-tested bestseller format for a 2,500-year-old tradition that comes off as anything but ancient. With the "Five T''s of Concentration," the question of "need or greed," and the story of the monk who bares his backside to prove a point, Surya Das invokes a path of wisdom that is as accessible and down-to-earth as a worn pair of loafers. It''s not an easy path--it demands thought, effort, and discipline. But Surya Das is there for you, lighting the way to wisdom training, coaxing you into ethics training, and laying out step by step the path of meditation training. And if that''s not enough to get you to live in the now, consider these words of the enlightened lama: "You must be present to win." --Brian Bruya

Review

"A warm, accessible, deep, brilliantly written exploration and adventure along the Buddhist path." --Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D.

"[T]his is a great achievement and I feel deeply grateful for it."
--Thich Nhat Hanh, author of Living Buddha, Living Christ

"This open-hearted offering of the Buddha''s teachings ranges from fundamentals to magic. It is a wonderful gift."
--Sharon Salzberg, author of Loving Kindness

"Wise and wonderful, gentle and profound. . . . This is surely one of the finest spiritual manuals meant for a larger public and it succeeds brilliantly."
--Ken Wilbur, author of A Brief History of Everything

From the Publisher

"A warm, accessible, deep, brilliantly written exploration and adventure along the Buddhist path." --Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D.

"[T]his is a great achievement and I feel deeply grateful for it."
--Thich Nhat Hanh, author of Living Buddha, Living Christ

"This open-hearted offering of the Buddha''s teachings ranges from fundamentals to magic. It is a wonderful gift."
--Sharon Salzberg, author of Loving Kindness

"Wise and wonderful, gentle and profound. . . . This is surely one of the finest spiritual manuals meant for a larger public and it succeeds brilliantly."
--Ken Wilbur, author of A Brief History of Everything

From the Inside Flap

Lama Surya Das, the most highly trained American lama in the Tibetan tradition, presents the definitive book on Western Buddhism for the modern-day spiritual seeker.

The radical and compelling message of Buddhism tells us that each of us has the wisdom, awareness, love, and power of the Buddha within; yet most of us are too often like sleeping Buddhas.  In Awakening the Buddha Within, Surya Das shows how we can awaken to who we really are in order to lead a more compassionate, enlightened, and balanced life.  It illuminates the guidelines and key principles embodied in the noble Eight-Fold Path and the traditional Three Enlightenment Trainings common to all schools of Buddhism:

Wisdom Training: Developing clear vision, insight, and inner understanding -- seeing reality and ourselves as we really are.
Ethics Training: Cultivating virtue, self-discipline, and compassion in what we say and do.
Meditation Training: Practicing mindfulness, concentration, and awareness of the present moment.

With lively stories, meditations, and spiritual practices, Awakening the Buddha Within is an invaluable text for the novice and experienced student of Buddhism alike.

From the Back Cover

Lama Surya Das, the most highly trained American lama in the Tibetan tradition, presents the definitive book on Western Buddhism for the modern-day spiritual seeker.
The radical and compelling message of Buddhism tells us that each of us has the wisdom, awareness, love, and power of the Buddha within; yet most of us are too often like sleeping Buddhas. In Awakening the Buddha Within, Surya Das shows how we can awaken to who we really are in order to lead a more compassionate, enlightened, and balanced life. It illuminates the guidelines and key principles embodied in the noble Eight-Fold Path and the traditional Three Enlightenment Trainings common to all schools of Buddhism:
Wisdom Training: Developing clear vision, insight, and inner understanding -- seeing reality and ourselves as we really are.
Ethics Training: Cultivating virtue, self-discipline, and compassion in what we say and do.
Meditation Training: Practicing mindfulness, concentration, and awareness of the present moment.
With lively stories, meditations, and spiritual practices, Awakening the Buddha Within is an invaluable text for the novice and experienced student of Buddhism alike.

About the Author

Lama Surya Das, a leading spokesperson for the emerging Western Buddhism, is a Dzogchen lineage holder and the founder of the Dzogchen Foundation.  He  leads lectures and retreats worldwide and regularly organizes the annual Western Buddhist Teachers Conference with the Dalai Lama.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Once the holy Hasidic master Baal Shem sent Yacov Yosef, his second-greatest pupil, an outstanding scholar and Kabbalist, to test the learning of Yechiel, a prospective son-in-law for Baal Shem''s daughter, Udel.  Yechiel, like the holy master, came from a simple German Jewish family.

When Yacov Yosef returned from his mission, he reported back to the Baal Shem Tov:
"Yechiel answered, ''I don''t know'' to everything I asked him.  I wonder about this guy..."

The Baal Shem Tov replied, "Oh God, I''d love to have such a man as my son-in-law."

The young man told the simple truth, which is sometimes easier said than done, and the old rabbi recognized his wisdom.  Words can be gifts, words can be weapons, words can be magic; words can be prayer, poetry, or song.  What is traditionally known as Right Speech is the third touchstone on the Eight-Fold Path.  So speak your truth.  Tell it like it is.  There is no reason to do otherwise.

Everything You Say Can Express Your Buddha-Nature

In a world of exaggerated advertising campaigns, exploitative talk shows, hate radio, and political spin doctors, Right Speech and impeccable expression may seem to be a rather tall order.  Yet if we are sincere about embodying the Dharma, our words ideally will become a reflection of our desire to help others.  Think kindly; speak gently and clearly.  The wisdom of cause and effect--or karma--teaches us that everything matters--every breath, every syllable, every sentence.  As we walk the path to enlightenment, nothing is meaningless, and it all counts.  Imagine that all the thoughts and fragmented sentences that are just now swirling through your head were printed out on a giant chalkboard--like the daily menu in some restaurants.  Which thoughts do you sincerely want to express? It''s a choice we make--sometimes hundreds of times every day.  With your words you confirm to the world, and yourself, what you think is important.  Words help concretize our thoughts and concepts; they define our priorities, reify our ideas and opinions, and express our worldview and intentions.  Words have power; to be specific, your words have power.  We can use speech patterns to help us communicate with others in a more considered, conscious way, or we can be careless and create trouble with our words--trouble for ourselves as well as others.

In the context of Dharma, speech is a particularly compelling issue because to reflect upon speech is to think about self, non-self, and others.  Don''t most of us use speech as an expression of ego and the need to hang on to and confirm our illusory self?  Don''t we use speech to communicate that we exist? "I''m here," we say, confirming and marking out our territorial space.  To some extent, we all habitually use words to express ego and a false self.  By putting forth our views, we use speech to shore up the concrete citadel of ego and the notion of "me" and "mine." We tell ourselves and others stories about ourselves and our lives.  We speak to others; we speak to ourselves.  What do we say?  And why do we say it?

When the Buddha talked about Right Speech or impeccable speech, what he meant was excellent speech that reflected inner wisdom, clear vision, and Buddha-nature.  The instructions that come down to us from the Buddha concerning everyday speech are simple yet profound.  On a mundane level, we are instructed as follows:

Speak the Truth, Tell No Lies

On this point, the Buddha''s advice was remarkably straightforward.  He said: "If he is called to tell what he knows, he answers if he knows nothing: ''I know nothing.'' And if he knows, he answers, ''I know.''  If he has seen nothing, he answers: ''I have seen nothing.''  And if he has seen, he answers: ''I have seen.'' Thus, he never knowingly speaks a lie, neither for the sake of his own advantage, nor for the sake of another person''s advantage, nor for the sake of any advantage whatsoever."

Words articulated without guile, masked ego needs, conflict, or hidden agendas--wouldn''t it be wonderful to be able to speak with such clarity and simplicity, all the time?  Haven''t there been times in your life when you are so centered and clear that your words, like the Buddha''s, ring with truth and sanity?  Don''t we all sometimes have these breakthrough moments, times when we are in touch with who we are and what we know?  These are precious moments, minutes, or hours when each of us is able to speak his or her own truth, honestly and fearlessly.  But these breakthroughs are difficult to sustain.

As a seeker, you have probably already wrestled with the problems connected to outright lying; in all likelihood, you''ve made an appropriate decision not to be evasive or indulge in direct falsehoods or deceitful, manipulative statements.  We all agree that outright lying is counterproductive.  But as we walk further along the spiritual path, chances are we will each arrive at checkpoints where the subtleties of truth come into play.  We may discover time after time that it''s difficult to be clear and forthright in everything we say, and we may find ourselves compromising and shading the truth.  Instead of saying what we know is true, for example, we say things that others want to hear.  Or we say things that we want to hear--and believe.

When we don''t want to appear weak or vulnerable, we say things that make us look strong and powerful.  When we don''t want others to think we are out of control, we use words to control what others do.  It''s very easy to spot the manipulations of the spin doctors from Madison Avenue or Washington, D.C.; it''s more complex when we create our own egotistical advertising campaigns.  Yet this is what we do all the time by presenting ourselves as we would like to appear and hiding behind the stories we tell ourselves and others to get what we think we want.  All this only serves to create false personas that leave us feeling incomplete and alienated from our authentic selves.

Don''t you sometimes use words to distance others and protect your true feelings? Haven''t you ever told people that you were feeling "fine" even when you were depressed and sad? We don''t always use words to communicate from our hearts and then we expect others to be mind readers.  Sometimes we even tell ourselves stories.  "I don''t eat so many sweets," we say to ourselves as we reach again into the bag of cookies.  "I''m not really lying to Miranda," we think as we make up a plausible excuse to break an appointment.  "It doesn''t really matter," we reassure ourselves, even when we know it matters a great deal.

Everyone says that communication and mutual understanding is the essence of good relationships.  And nowhere are the subtleties of honest speech more apparent than in our personal relationships.  However, as much as we may want to express ourselves authentically with words that reflect love, warmth, and openness, we don''t always manage to do it.  Our expectations get in the way and distort the picture; so do our desires, fears, illusions, and projections.  That''s why we all regularly need to stop and ask ourselves if we are moving in the direction of more honesty, or not.

I often speak to people who tell me they are unhappy because their loved ones don''t seem to be listening to what they have to say.  They feel invalidated and as though their opinions are being disregarded.  But when these people delve a little bit deeper below the surface of their complaints, they often realize they are failing to express their feelings and wishes in a clear and direct manner.  When we withhold our true feelings, protect our emotions, and construct false personas to present to the world, we become part of the problem.

Reality--seeing things just as they are--is a central issue of Buddhist practice.  Pure attention, unclouded by distortion or delusion, knows things exactly as they are, in the present moment.  We bring Right Speech into our relationships by trying always to be honest and forthright and by letting go of our intricate defense systems and being truthful and open about who we are and how we feel.

As part of awareness practice involving Right Speech, try listening to yourself so you can hear how you sound from a different perspective, as if being outside of yourself as an objective listener.  Speaking the truth is a very present-moment activity; truth-telling begins by becoming aware of what you tell yourself.  Then try listening to the way you sound to others.  Do you sound tentative, confused, angry, rattled, tense? Are you using speech to manipulate feelings or emotions, yours or someone else''s? Do you use speech, or even silence, as a way of hiding who you are? Are you communicating what you think you''re communicating? Are you able to recognize and acknowledge reality? Are you able to speak your truth in your own authentic voice, unflinchingly and without hesitation?

Use Words to Help, Not Harm

Right Speech Reminds Us To Refrain From Causing Trouble With Speech That Is Hurtful Or Unnecessarily Disruptive  Have you ever had the experience of saying something and regretting it later?  Perhaps something sarcastic that you thought was funny?  Of course.  We all have.  When I began teaching, I quickly realized that if I made what I thought was a little ironic or facetious joke, some sensitive soul might end up feeling hurt, ridiculed, exposed, or betrayed.

One of Atisha''s mind-training Lo-jong Slogans is Don''t Talk About Injured Limbs  It''s a good slogan to remember because what we describe as a joke may in reality be pointing out another being''s defects and weaknesses--not unlike staring or pointing a finger.  It can be hurtful even though we are backing into it through a joke.  And yet how hard it is to walk this talk.  What a temptation it sometimes is to poke fun or show how funny and clever we can be with our quick tongues and caustic wit.  Hurtful words reinforce personal alienation and a dualistic view.  Slander sows discord; sensitive gentle speech can bring about peace and reconciliation.

The Dharma also reminds us that a judgmental point of view will obscure our higher view and distort our direct appreciation of how things are.  In the New Testament, Jesus points out that we tend to notice the small imperfection in someone else''s eye while overlooking the log sticking out of our own.  A Tibetan proverb says: "Don''t notice the tiny flea in the other person''s hair and overlook the lumbering yak on your own nose." Judgmental words and self-righteous tones fail to help any situation.

Some people seem to be particularly gifted at using words to help others.  They are so constructive, positive, and empathetic that they make you feel good whenever you talk to them.  "How great for you," they say.  "Tell me about it; I want to hear what you have to say." You can feel their intention to give support and encouragement.  These communicative geniuses seem to have a special gift--they are able to truly see and hear others.  Open and sensitive to what others are experiencing, these gifted listeners are real healers.  Listening with a nonjudgmental and open heart is a way to bring bodhicitta and loving-kindness into your communication with others.  The Dharma tells us that if we listen carefully, we will be able to hear the natural Buddha in everyone.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
611 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

2k's
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Highly recommended
Reviewed in the United States on October 13, 2017
This book will change your life. It''s not necessarily a front to back read but you can go about it that way for your first time through. Now I''ll flip to a section and see what resonates. There are so many life lessons here that will help you get through your daily life,... See more
This book will change your life. It''s not necessarily a front to back read but you can go about it that way for your first time through. Now I''ll flip to a section and see what resonates. There are so many life lessons here that will help you get through your daily life, helping you to stay present and take time to love yourself which is so important.
17 people found this helpful
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Mel H. Pine
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great for Those at Any Level
Reviewed in the United States on August 12, 2016
I have read some of Lama Surya''s later books and attended his retreats, which I highly recommend. I had avoided this one, thinking it was probably too basic. But once I decided to read it, I loved every page. I''d recommend it for a beginner or for someone more experienced... See more
I have read some of Lama Surya''s later books and attended his retreats, which I highly recommend. I had avoided this one, thinking it was probably too basic. But once I decided to read it, I loved every page. I''d recommend it for a beginner or for someone more experienced who''d like a clear view or Buddhism from one of the great American teachers.
19 people found this helpful
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Reviwer1.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
life guide
Reviewed in the United States on May 4, 2019
This book I got on audio cassettes when came out, had a major impact on my path to understand mindfulness, glad the audio cassettes now available in Audio books, however the audio while has the main points, does not cover the entire book, I wanted to have all the words and... See more
This book I got on audio cassettes when came out, had a major impact on my path to understand mindfulness, glad the audio cassettes now available in Audio books, however the audio while has the main points, does not cover the entire book, I wanted to have all the words and read them slowly and repeatedly. I find understanding of this books is one of the foundations of mindfulness.
5 people found this helpful
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Charlyn G. Laughead
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Adding Buddha Concept to Spiritual Awareness
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2016
Lama Surya Das is a Western Buddhist activist in that he grew up in the United States and then studied the Eastern religious concepts and beliefs, thereby becoming a practicing Buddhist. His approach is to blend Eastern understanding of the Buddhist teachings into the... See more
Lama Surya Das is a Western Buddhist activist in that he grew up in the United States and then studied the Eastern religious concepts and beliefs, thereby becoming a practicing Buddhist. His approach is to blend Eastern understanding of the Buddhist teachings into the Western context so that the benefit of Eastern philosophy can be utilized by Westerners, invoking the flow, calm and wisdom of living life left by earlier teachers or avatars to the world, wherever a person is while experiencing the events of life. This book studies the process and acquisition of altering life patterns that lead toward achieving enlightenment. A helpful, easy to understand presentation.
6 people found this helpful
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LA Smith
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well written if you are looking for a lot of ...
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2015
Well written if you are looking for a lot of detail regarding mindset and deep thoughts. For me, this book is a little dragged out - the author seem to want to included commentary on every thought he has had since he was eight years old, daily accounts and... See more
Well written if you are looking for a lot of detail regarding mindset and deep thoughts.

For me, this book is a little dragged out - the author seem to want to included commentary on every thought he has had since he was eight years old, daily accounts and observations.

However, he does give enough information about the Buddha and the spiritual practice to make me want to learn more. In fact I''ve highlighted many passages and have been driven to the internet to get more detailed information about the teachings Lama Surya Das experienced.
8 people found this helpful
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Anne Swan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wish I''d read this book decades ago; clear explanations of main Buddhist concepts in terms we Westerners understand
Reviewed in the United States on March 25, 2014
Here is a clear, easy-to-understand summary and explanation of the main concepts of Buddhist philosophy. Lama Surya Das has the credentials in both Eastern and Western thought to explain these concepts. Centuries of wisdom are packed into one book.... See more
Here is a clear, easy-to-understand summary and explanation of the main concepts of Buddhist philosophy.

Lama Surya Das has the credentials in both Eastern and Western thought to explain these concepts.

Centuries of wisdom are packed into one book. This is a basic reference book that you can return to for years for information, inspiration, and insight.

Whether you intend to adhere to Buddhist thought or whether you want to learn more about the concepts, this book will be useful.

Lama Surya Das doesn''t "lecture;" he explains. This is not a "dull" philosophy book; it lists concepts and explains them in terms we Westerners can understand and relate to.
10 people found this helpful
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Kathryn Shimmura
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
clear and accessible
Reviewed in the United States on January 1, 2011
I first read part of this about 6-7 years ago. Although I agreed with all of the ideas and ideals of Buddhism presented, I did not commit myself to the path but I called myself a Buddhist. I am now reading the entire book, getting much more out of it and dedicating myself... See more
I first read part of this about 6-7 years ago. Although I agreed with all of the ideas and ideals of Buddhism presented, I did not commit myself to the path but I called myself a Buddhist. I am now reading the entire book, getting much more out of it and dedicating myself to the Buddhist path. I was raised as a Christian but did not find meaning in that faith and proceeded to do a lot of searching, checking out Daoism, Sufism, astrology, spiritualism, psychism and all sorts of other ideas.
Lama Surya Das, although accused of presenting "Buddhism Lite," knows what he is talking about, having spent many years mediating and learning from Tibetan lamas. This is a well written, clear, practical and easy to understand introduction to Buddhism. That doesn''t mean it''s an easy read. There is a huge amount of information and explanation so you can''t just swallow it whole. It takes time to absorb and once you begin to begin to practice it, your understanding deepens. We all have to start where we are and no one becomes enlightened overnight. Any effort you make is worth it. No matter what your religion or lack of it, you can benefit from the ideas presented.
9 people found this helpful
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Bharat Mans
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing Insights
Reviewed in the United States on October 25, 2020
Do not read the book just to learn about Buddhism. This is a book towards righteousness, a book that will take you towards peace and happiness both as a receiver and as a giver. There may be eight steps but the results are two : Lasting PEACE and HAPPINESS
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Top reviews from other countries

charlie james
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
wonderfully informative, enriching yet down to earth and easy to read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 3, 2015
What a Fab book. Written by a westerner who traveled to learn Buddhism and then took it back to the western part of the world, I have found it a down to earth, well written book. It provides loads of information which helps you with the history of the religion and how it...See more
What a Fab book. Written by a westerner who traveled to learn Buddhism and then took it back to the western part of the world, I have found it a down to earth, well written book. It provides loads of information which helps you with the history of the religion and how it came to be as well as what all the words mean and the beliefs. It flows well and you learn more than you realise you are doing because it is an easy read.The language is straightforward and not flowery which would have put me off. In the descriptions, explanation and information you feel enriched anyway. I do not feel overawed by all the Buddhist terms now (or the people who use them). I can choose to use the Buddhist words or stick to the western words. It is written in short chapters and so it is easy to read a small amount if that is all you have time for, or several chapters. It is easy to stop and I enjoy stopping to reflect and let it sink in. It is easy to read. It does have some lovely poems which i have used when taking a mindfulness session.
3 people found this helpful
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E. Dalhuijsen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent, and a calm-inducing read in the process..
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 5, 2010
I read my brother''s copy, and having read it ordered one for a good friend.. the fascinating thing I found with this book is the calm it induces every time I read a paragraph or two (or more). It is easy to read, leaves your mind free to consider its own preferred way,...See more
I read my brother''s copy, and having read it ordered one for a good friend.. the fascinating thing I found with this book is the calm it induces every time I read a paragraph or two (or more). It is easy to read, leaves your mind free to consider its own preferred way, while giving enough information if your mind doesn''t have a particular preferred way yet. Anecdotes and examples are well chosen and illustrative, and the language is clear. If you''ve ever thought buddhism might have a point, this is the place where you can find out which parts of it fit you, or just have a pleasant and informative read. Fantastic book!
2 people found this helpful
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storm
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Easy to understand
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 8, 2020
Good as a starter book about Buddhism. It explains everything in an easy to understand way: what Buddhism is and what is involved in Buddhist practice and meditation. For all it''s simplicity and everyday language, this is a book that can be referred to or re-read again and...See more
Good as a starter book about Buddhism. It explains everything in an easy to understand way: what Buddhism is and what is involved in Buddhist practice and meditation. For all it''s simplicity and everyday language, this is a book that can be referred to or re-read again and again.
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ALLAN W ROBINSON
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic read, very easy to understand in basic terms
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 30, 2020
All who want to better their lives by trying to understand yourself, truly opened my eyes and mind to how simple things in everyday life can improve my path.
One person found this helpful
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Tingdzin Wongmo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not just for beginners!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 7, 2009
As an experienced student of Buddhism I found this book fairly easy reading but still providing valuable material for reflection. This book has been my bed-time reading along with daytime study of Gampopa''s "Jewel Ornament of Liberation". I''ve found the parallels between...See more
As an experienced student of Buddhism I found this book fairly easy reading but still providing valuable material for reflection. This book has been my bed-time reading along with daytime study of Gampopa''s "Jewel Ornament of Liberation". I''ve found the parallels between topics covered most interesting, this book providing insights to assist with deeper understanding of the JOL, though it''s not presented as being linked to it in any way. I haven''t actually finished the book yet - it''s worthy of more than speed reading - but I have no hesitation in recommending it.
3 people found this helpful
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Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale

Awakening sale the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for wholesale the Western World outlet sale