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Product Description

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR by Booklist • Kirkus 

Celebrate all the ways love makes us who we are with the romance that Entertainment Weekly calls "wise, wildly unique"--from the bestselling co-author of Nick and Norah''s Infinite Playlist and Will Grayson, Will Grayson--about a teen who wakes up every morning in a different body, living a different life. Now a major motion picture!

Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

With his new novel, David Levithan, bestselling co-author of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, and Nick and Norah''s Infinite Playlist, has pushed himself to new creative heights. He has written a captivating story that will fascinate readers as they begin to comprehend the complexities of life and love in A’s world, as A and Rhiannon seek to discover if you can truly love someone who is destined to change every day.

“A story that is always alluring, oftentimes humorous and much like love itself— splendorous.” —Los Angeles Times

Review

School Library Journal Best of Children''s Books 2012

Kirkus Reviews Best of Teen''s Books 2012

Booklist Best of Children''s Books 2012


"Fresh, unique, funny, and achingly honest, Levithan brilliantly explores the adolescent conundrum of not feeling like oneself, and not knowing where one belongs. I didn''t just read this book — I inhaled it."  — Jodi Picoult, NYT bestselling author of Lone Wolf and Between the Lines

Entertainment Weekly
, August 22, 2012:

"Rich in wisdom and wit...Levithan keeps the pages turning not only with ingenious twists on his central conceit but with A''s hard-earned pieces of wisdom about identity, isolation, and love. Every Day has the power to teach a bully empathy by answering an essential question: What''s it like to be you and not me — even if it''s just for one day?"

New York Times Book Review , August 26, 2012:
"It demonstrates Levithan''s talent for empathy, which is paired in the best parts of the book with a persuasive optimism about the odds for happiness and for true love."

Los Angeles Times , September 2, 2012:
"It''s the rare book that challenges gender presumptions in a way that''s as entertaining as it is unexpected and, perhaps most important, that''s relatable to teens who may not think they need sensitivity training when it comes to sexual orientation and the nature of true love. ‘Every Day'' is precisely such a book...A story that is always alluring, oftentimes humorous and much like love itself — splendorous."

MTV Hollywood Crush , September 28, 2012:
"Thoughtful and fascinating...A study in the most real and human of concerns: the importance of empathy, the value of friends and family, and the beauty of permanence that we have the luxury of taking for granted."

Boston Globe, September 15, 2012:
"Ambitious and provocative...we’re not ready to let A go."

OUT Magazine , December 2012:
"One of the most inventive young adult novels of the year."

Romantic Times , October 2012:
"Levithan is a literary genius. His style of writing is brilliant — practically flawless... Reading A’s journey to make love last, in a world that is always changing, is an experience I hope everyone gets to share."

Starred Review, School Library Journal, September 2012:
"Every step of the narrative feels real and will elicit a strong emotional response from readers and offer them plenty of fodder for speculation, especially regarding the nature of love.”

Starred Review, Booklist, July 1, 2012:
“Levithan has created an irresistible premise that is sure to captivate readers….
[ Every Day] is a study in style, an exercise in imagination, and an opportunity for readers themselves to occupy another life: that of A, himself.”

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012:
“An awe-inspiring, thought-provoking reminder that love reaches beyond physical appearances or gender.”

Starred Review, Shelf Awareness, September 7, 2012:
"Levithan''s unusual love story will make teens think about how the core of the soul never changes. A speaks of faith, love, dreams and death with a wisdom derived from thousands of lives visited over 16 years and firsthand proof of how much humans share rather than what sets them apart."

The Bulletin of the Center for Children''s Books, September 2012:
"This unconventional romance considers some fascinating and unexpected questions about the nature of identity, consciousness, love, and gender...Readers will identify with A’s profound longing for connection, but they’ll also be intrigued by the butterfly effect A’s presence may have on numerous other teens who make brief but memorable appearances."

The Horn Book , November 2012:
"Brilliantly conceived...[Levithan] shapes the narrative into a profound exploration of what it means to love someone."

Letter Blocks , the BN Parents & Educators blog, August 23, 2012:
"A definite crowd-pleaser."

The L Magazine , August 29, 2012:
"The premise allows for stimulating parallels: A’s experience is both like the writer’s, who inhabits the consciousnesses of random characters, and the adolescent’s, who tries on myriad identities."

About the Author

DAVID LEVITHAN is a children''s book editor in New York City, and the author of several books for young adults, including Nick & Norah''s Infinite Playlist and Dash & Lily''s Book of Dares (co-authored with Rachel Cohn); Will Grayson, Will Grayson (co-authored with John Green); and Every You, Every Me (with photographs from Jonathan Farmer). He lives in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Day 5994

I wake up.

Immediately I have to figure out who I am. It’s not just the body--opening my eyes and discovering whether the skin on my arm is light or dark, whether my hair is long or short, whether I’m fat or thin, boy or girl, scarred or smooth. The body is the easiest thing to adjust to, if you’re used to waking up in a new one each morning. It’s the life, the context of the body, that can be hard to grasp.

Every day I am someone else. I am myself--I know I am myself--but I am also someone else.

It has always been like this.

The information is there. I wake up, open my eyes, understand that it is a new morning, a new place. The biography kicks in, a welcome gift from the not‑me part of the mind. Today I am Justin. Somehow I know this--my name is Justin--and at the same time I know that I’m not really Justin, I’m only borrowing his life for a day. I look around and know that this is his room. This is his home. The alarm will go off in seven minutes.

I’m never the same person twice, but I’ve certainly been this type before. Clothes everywhere. Far more video games than books. Sleeps in his boxers. From the taste of his mouth, a smoker. But not so addicted that he needs one as soon as he wakes up.

“Good morning, Justin,” I say. Checking out his voice. Low. The voice in my head is always different.

Justin doesn’t take care of himself. His scalp itches. His eyes don’t want to open. He hasn’t gotten much sleep.

Already I know I’m not going to like today.

It’s hard being in the body of someone you don’t like, because you still have to respect it. I’ve harmed people’s lives in the past, and I’ve found that every time I slip up, it haunts me. So I try to be careful.

From what I can tell, every person I inhabit is the same age as me. I don’t hop from being sixteen to being sixty. Right now, it’s only sixteen. I don’t know how this works. Or why. I stopped trying to figure it out a long time ago. I’m never going to figure it out, any more than a normal person will figure out his or her own existence. After a while, you have to be at peace with the fact that you simply are. There is no way to know why. You can have theories, but there will never be proof.

I can access facts, not feelings. I know this is Justin’s room, but I have no idea if he likes it or not. Does he want to kill his parents in the next room? Or would he be lost without his mother coming in to make sure he’s awake? It’s impossible to tell. It’s as if that part of me replaces the same part of whatever person I’m in. And while I’m glad to be thinking like myself, a hint every now and then of how the other person thinks would be helpful. We all contain mysteries, especially when seen from the inside.

The alarm goes off. I reach for a shirt and some jeans, but something lets me see that it’s the same shirt he wore yesterday. I pick a different shirt. I take the clothes with me to the bathroom, dress after showering. His parents are in the kitchen now. They have no idea that anything is different.

Sixteen years is a lot of time to practice. I don’t usually make mistakes. Not anymore.

I read his parents easily: Justin doesn’t talk to them much in the morning, so I don’t have to talk to them. I have grown accustomed to sensing expectation in others, or the lack of it. I shovel down some cereal, leave the bowl in the sink without washing it, grab Justin’s keys and go.

Yesterday I was a girl in a town I’d guess to be two hours away. The day before, I was a boy in a town three hours farther than that. I am already forgetting their details. I have to, or else I will never remember who I really am.

Justin listens to loud and obnoxious music on a loud and obnoxious station where loud and obnoxious DJs make loud and obnoxious jokes as a way of getting through the morning. This is all I need to know about Justin, really. I access his memory to show me the way to school, which parking space to take, which locker to go to. The combination. The names of the people he knows in the halls.

Sometimes I can’t go through these motions. I can’t bring myself to go to school, maneuver through the day. I’ll say I’m sick, stay in bed and read a few books. But even that gets tiresome after a while, and I find myself up for the challenge of a new school, new friends. For a day.

As I take Justin’s books out of his locker, I can feel someone hovering on the periphery. I turn, and the girl standing there is transparent in her emotions--tentative and expectant, nervous and adoring. I don’t have to access Justin to know that this is his girlfriend. No one else would have this reaction to him, so unsteady in his presence. She’s pretty, but she doesn’t see it. She’s hiding behind her hair, happy to see me and unhappy to see me at the same time.

Her name is Rhiannon. And for a moment--just the slightest beat--I think that, yes, this is the right name for her. I don’t know why. I don’t know her. But it feels right.

This is not Justin’s thought. It’s mine. I try to ignore it. I’m not the person she wants to talk to.

“Hey,” I say, keeping it casual.

“Hey,” she murmurs back.

She’s looking at the floor, at her inked‑in Converse. She’s drawn cities there, skylines around the soles. Something’s happened between her and Justin, and I don’t know what it is. It’s probably not something that Justin even recognized at the time.

“Are you okay?” I ask.

I see the surprise on her face, even as she tries to cover it. This is not something that Justin normally asks.

And the strange thing is: I want to know the answer. The fact that he wouldn’t care makes me want it more.

“Sure,” she says, not sounding sure at all.

I find it hard to look at her. I know from experience that beneath every peripheral girl is a central truth. She’s hiding hers away, but at the same time she wants me to see it. That is, she wants Justin to see it. And it’s there, just out of my reach. A sound waiting to be a word.

She is so lost in her sadness that she has no idea how visible it is. I think I understand her--for a moment, I presume to understand her--but then, from within this sadness, she surprises me with a brief flash of determination. Bravery, even.

Shifting her gaze away from the floor, her eyes matching mine, she asks, “Are you mad at me?”

I can’t think of any reason to be mad at her. If anything, I am mad at Justin, for making her feel so diminished. It’s there in her body language. When she is around him, she makes herself small.

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Top reviews from the United States

Luciana
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good - until Finn.
Reviewed in the United States on March 26, 2018
The premise is outstanding. The writing style is beautiful and reflective, which makes writing this review painful to me. I enjoyed the book overall. Yes, it''s very romance driven, which can only make me assume that the moral of the series is finding meaning in loving... See more
The premise is outstanding. The writing style is beautiful and reflective, which makes writing this review painful to me. I enjoyed the book overall. Yes, it''s very romance driven, which can only make me assume that the moral of the series is finding meaning in loving others. But then we get to the chapter on Finn, a 300-pound kid.

Throughout the book Levithan does an outstanding job at describing each person A (the main character) inhabits, giving each character a story, a humane level of respect, the benefit of the doubt even.

Everyone, except Finn.

With Finn, the author immediately tosses us into a world of self-loathing based entirely on A''s assumption that being obese is the reason for self-loathing. Instead of looking at obesity as a symptom of deeper issues both mental and physical, A, cannot see beyond Finn''s body to assess how it all happened - leaving us to once again, assume that all fat people got there through their own choices and nothing else. At one point A even equates Finn''s emotions to a burp and describes that he/she COULD look deeper into Finn and find there some level of humanity. But he/she never tried. Instead, A couldn''t get out of Finn''s body soon enough - leaving Finn with no vote of confidence, and not even the decency of telling us his story.

If Levithan had done the same for the gay, trans, black, Asian etc. stories in his book, there would have been an uproar of condemnation. But it''s still okay to pick on the fat kid - and I am disappointed that a character who has no body of his/her own, is still passing judgment on the body of another who did not ask to be inhabited, and certainly did not ask to be inhabited and judged.

It appears that to A (and Levithan) being fat is so far worse than being a creeper who jumps from body to body with no physical body of his/her own. It''s amusing to me that A can argue his/her own value to Rhiannon, but not see Finn''s value as a human being.

Considering that so many kids and adults have eating disorders and body-shame issues that lead to all sorts of destructive patterns - this chapter should have been carefully examined. I am surprised that editors and family let him get away with this.

The best I can hope for is that A ends up in the body of Finn again, where he/she has to finally learn to love himself. Then, and only then, will Finn have a chance to be truly seen and understood.
103 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Shallow Stereotyping
Reviewed in the United States on December 2, 2018
A’s experience in Every Day is problematic for a plethora of reasons; they do not care about the damage they cause in the lives of those who they inhabit, they judge every body they are in within minutes of waking up, and they are patronizing towards the issues and desires... See more
A’s experience in Every Day is problematic for a plethora of reasons; they do not care about the damage they cause in the lives of those who they inhabit, they judge every body they are in within minutes of waking up, and they are patronizing towards the issues and desires of these people. There is not a single character in the book that does not at least partially rely on heavy stereotyping as A’s method of “knowing” their life story. Because A only spends one day in each of these bodies, they experience cultural tourism and believe that they know everything there is to know about both these bodies as individuals, but also about the cultures to which they belong. This is very dangerous for young people, as A normalizes immediate judgements on different cultures and experiences, and also places each person into a single role without regard for complexity or the intersection of multiple identities. A’s treatment of Finn is especially problematic, as they show their extreme fatphobia and disgust with someone who is not a “normal” weight. A immediately believes that Finn is just fat and useless without any real substance to his personality. Lastly, the depiction of Rhiannon’s character is also extremely problematic because of the single story she is given for both her unhealthy relationship and her sexuality. She perfectly fits into the single story for a girl in a borderline-abusive relationship, and must be saved by a new man, Alexander, who was given to her by A. Similarly, A is unable to accept Rhiannon’s lack of sexual attraction to A in certain bodies, but especially when they inhabit women. Rhiannon is a straight person, and that should not be characterized as her being close-minded or shallow. A becomes irritated with Rhiannon’s straightness, which is yet another unhealthy representation for young people. Every Day attempts to create a new and exciting storyline in YA literature, but because it falls so short in these areas, it must either be read with extreme caution or avoided entirely.
34 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good concept poor execution
Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2018
I was really intrigued by the unique concept of this book and after reading other good reviews I decided to get it. It started out very interesting, but as I kept reading I realized the plot wasn''t going anywhere. A''s experience as each person was cool from their... See more
I was really intrigued by the unique concept of this book and after reading other good reviews I decided to get it. It started out very interesting, but as I kept reading I realized the plot wasn''t going anywhere. A''s experience as each person was cool from their perspective, especially because A was able to accept and appreciate such a diverse group of individuals (except for one guy who A fat shamed when in his body- not cool). Unfortunately I kept hoping there would be answers to A''s situation or least some closure/acceptance with who they were. In the end, A ended up running away from their problems and not really in a self discovery kind of way. I don''t regret reading it, but it left an unfinished and bad taste in my mouth.
20 people found this helpful
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Casey CarlisleTop Contributor: Fantasy Books
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great romance with a philosophical view on what is identity and the soul.
Reviewed in the United States on August 6, 2018
Actual rating 4.5 stars. This book consumed me. I read in one sitting, totally engrossed in the condition of the human soul and its ability to love. The spirit of A goes beyond gender and sexual identity and into a space of simply ‘being.’ It was such... See more
Actual rating 4.5 stars.

This book consumed me. I read in one sitting, totally engrossed in the condition of the human soul and its ability to love.

The spirit of A goes beyond gender and sexual identity and into a space of simply ‘being.’ It was such an amazing perspective on existence. Juxatpose that with the love interest, Rhiannon’s perception and interactions with A and her gradual understanding and acceptance of A, and their humanity, and you end up with a universal attitude of love and acceptance of everyone. It was truly inspired.

On the other hand, being A was weird. Always the interloper, unsure of your very existence. It’s a hard place to be. Alone and transient. Enough to send you completely bonkers. But A finds a way to balance it all. A''s own desires and wishes without impacting the lives of the bodies that are being borrowed for the day.

I loved toe tone of zero prejudice about the physical being and of identity. I loved getting to walk, if somewhat briefly, in so many other people’s lives and feel that impact.

While we only get the tiniest hint of the mythology behind A and his existence, the rest of the novel feels like a social commentary on identity and how we treat each other. How we are all different, yet the same. I wanted to get involved more into the reasons why A was the way he was – a wandering soul. I was hoping that in the sequel ‘Another Day’ I’d get more answers, but alas, only another brief touch on the mythology. I have my fingers crossed that we can really sink out teeth into the paranormal or science fiction of it all in the third book of the series ‘Someday’ due out on the 2nd of October this year. Not long to wait now!

There’s not much to say about this novel. It’s a romance, a character study with a heavy dose of philosophy. I loved it. The concept so fresh in YA!

It’s a beautiful quick read that I highly recommend. The movie does not do it justice, but is still great viewing – though it concentrates more on the romance than of the theme - what is a soul and what makes us human.
6 people found this helpful
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JenP
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An interesting concept
Reviewed in the United States on January 7, 2019
This is a story about "A" who switches bodies every day. He is never the same person twice. At midnight he leaves the body he is in and wakes up in a new one. He can access their memories and no one is ever aware he was there. He tries not to interfere or get too... See more
This is a story about "A" who switches bodies every day. He is never the same person twice. At midnight he leaves the body he is in and wakes up in a new one. He can access their memories and no one is ever aware he was there. He tries not to interfere or get too attached to anyone knowing he is only there for one day.

It has been this way for as long as he can remember. He ages just like he would in his own body, but he doesn''t remember ever having his own. He wonders if there are others like him. One day he arrives in the body of a boy named Justin. He falls for Justin''s girlfriend, Rhianna. All of the sudden he has found someone he wants to be with each day. Rhianna and A try and figure out how they could ever be together when each day, A is a different person on the outside.

This is an interesting novel. It is a neat concept - changing bodies every day - never knowing who you are going to be in the morning. Boy, girl, happy, sad, good family, bad family.....he never had control. He didn''t know why it happened or when it started. He doesn''t remember being any different.

But when he meets Rhianna, it becomes a teenager novel. He falls for her immediately after only knowing her a few hours, and then no matter what body he is in, he has to see her. Try to be with her. She has a boyfriend. He finally tells her what he is, and she is accepting, but never really agrees they could be together. A pushes back - says there has to be a way. They both struggle with the idea of what it would be like to be with someone who never looks the same two days in a row.

I won''t spoil the end of the book, but I did like the ending. A redeems himself in my eyes. It is an interesting idea, and I did enjoy the story, so I vote to give it a try.
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araina williams
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
All over the place, in a bad way.
Reviewed in the United States on October 9, 2020
This book was writing just fine, and that’s being generous. I mostly had an issue with the development of characters. In some chapters, it feels like R completely changes as a person (internally, of course.) Some scenes and interactions just felt rushed for me. At times, I... See more
This book was writing just fine, and that’s being generous. I mostly had an issue with the development of characters. In some chapters, it feels like R completely changes as a person (internally, of course.) Some scenes and interactions just felt rushed for me. At times, I wondered if I missed a few pages. I was left confused a lot from page 200 and onward. I think the concept is charming, but it could have been better executed. The pacing feels off. The main character (narrator) changes dialect at random, which threw me off a lot. I couldn’t really tell what the tone was at times. If your reader is confused, you’re not doing a good job a writing.

A lot of people complain about the character, Finn, and how A interprets being in his body. I agree that it was definitely an odd and kind of insulting chapter. I could see how other people in the story other than A could be judgmental to others who are overweight. I expected R to act biased because it’s shown in the book multiple times that the amount of affection she shows to A is based on what gender they are. I did not expect A to make rude comments, though. They even state multiple times in the book that what matters is the person, you know, the entire premise of the book. But this chapter just contradicted everything A was narrating. I didn’t understand. They want R to love them for who they are, not what they look like. Which is the metaphor behind changing bodies every day. But, they complain and make snide comments when in an overweight body. I don’t know what David was thinking? I don’t get how this book can contradict itself so much.

There was also flaws with fleshing out the world. Some scenes describe is great detail where A is and what it looks like. Other scenes are barely described if they are at all.

It’s an okay mindless read, in my opinion. Pick this up if you just want something to read. Others may find this meaningful, and maybe you could, too. I don’t see what’s so good about this book, though. In my opinion, any review that’s more than two stars is being a bit generous.
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Jessica Hoffman
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Hook and bait i think that''s the phrase lol i got HOOKED
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2019
I didn''t give this 5 stars, although its a great book, i loved it, don''t get me wrong, because it doesn''t explain a whole lot to be honest. I read the book right before the movie came out, didnt even know about there being a movie. But i do tell you one thing, if you... See more
I didn''t give this 5 stars, although its a great book, i loved it, don''t get me wrong, because it doesn''t explain a whole lot to be honest. I read the book right before the movie came out, didnt even know about there being a movie.
But i do tell you one thing, if you have NOT read this before you saw the movie, you will be very clueless.
Anyway back to the book, I''m sure you read the info but its a love story that takes a little bit to build for Rhiannon, not so much for A. A jumps right on in there and falls head over heels for the first person he/she/it ever interacted with. Which i get, because "they" has probably desperately craving some interaction though, I feel sorry for A for the life they have led. But i woupd have LOVED more of a insight into their past. Like being born and being a toddler. Etc...
You get to know the characters pretty well, although i wouldnt mind knowing more about rhiannons family life. But i guess that doesnt have much to do with the point of the book.
I feel like this book is a gateway, like it really keeps you hanging on til the very end so you HAVE to buy the second book. Which i am. Lol
3 people found this helpful
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Salma
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A book you can read over and over again, and be stunned by each and every time.
Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2017
This is not a book you read, this is a book you open and devour. The night I read this, I had thoroughly planned on reading a few pages and calling it a night and sleeping. The night I began this book, I did not sleep at all. Far after I finished this book, I lay on my bed... See more
This is not a book you read, this is a book you open and devour. The night I read this, I had thoroughly planned on reading a few pages and calling it a night and sleeping. The night I began this book, I did not sleep at all. Far after I finished this book, I lay on my bed in quiet awe and contemplation, mourning the fact that the book was over as the sun began to creep into my room through the blinds.
There are few books that I have given up entire nights of sleep for, and even fewer still that have caused me to lie awake for hours afterwards in contemplation. The sheer lyrical prose of this book is breathtaking, truly. There were many times where I found myself quietly gasping aloud at the beauty of the words, at the stunning portrayal of a character filled to the brim with utter humanity despite not quite being human, but being EVERY human at the same time.
3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Chanatkins
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 16, 2018
This was a good read. The plot itself was enough to keep me reading, but the characterisation was also very good, as was the pace. ''A'' wakes up in a different body every day. They are always the same age, but might be a boy or a girl. A has never known anything other than...See more
This was a good read. The plot itself was enough to keep me reading, but the characterisation was also very good, as was the pace. ''A'' wakes up in a different body every day. They are always the same age, but might be a boy or a girl. A has never known anything other than this way of living. A tries very hard not to mess up the life of whoever he inhabits, but all this changes when he lives a day in the body of Justin, and falls in love with Justin''s girlfriend Rhiannon. This has never happened to A before, and suddenly he feels connected to someone, someone he wants to spend all his time with, but can''t. A, increasingly attracted to Rhiannon, then has to work out how to explain the situation to her, and also a way for them to make this work. Inevitably, A''s attraction and determination to be with Rhiannon start to play havoc with the lives of the people he inhabits. One such boy, Nathan, is very aware that something strange happened to him, and makes it his ambition to track A down. I liked the tangent the story went off on when it came to Nathan and Rev Poole. I thought this could have been examined more, but that would have potentially tipped the book into thriller territory. I felt like it very much wanted to be a love story. In essence, this is a love story, a romance novel about first love. Only with the added problem of one of the people in love having no body or identity of their own. Very interesting book!
6 people found this helpful
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Kat
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A real heart-stomper
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 5, 2013
It''s been nearly two weeks since I finished reading Every Day, and I''m only just now writing my review. Normally, I write my reviews within hours, or at most 2-3 days after finishing a book, as my sieve-like memory kicks in pretty quickly. But it''s taken me almost two weeks...See more
It''s been nearly two weeks since I finished reading Every Day, and I''m only just now writing my review. Normally, I write my reviews within hours, or at most 2-3 days after finishing a book, as my sieve-like memory kicks in pretty quickly. But it''s taken me almost two weeks to think about how to review Every Day, and I''m still thinking about the book and how it made me feel. Talking about A is difficult, because A doesn''t have a gender, or a body. I wouldn''t define A as a spirit, or a soul, but as a personality. A sweet, kind personality who does their best in a situation that''s completely unimaginable - waking up in a different body every single day from birth. A respects each inhabited body by only accessing the parts of their memories and brains that allow A to function through a day as that person, to know who their parents and friends are, where to go and how to behave in a way that minimises the chances of anyone realising something is wrong. In the beginning I didn''t really ''get'' why A was so attracted to Rhiannon, but as the story continued I began to really understand what was happening - after spending a lifetime with no particular attachment to anyone, A experiences an instant attraction, and not having had that experience before, does what most people do - becomes slightly obsessed with the person they have sparked with. And as the story progressed, I grew to like Rhiannon, and honestly felt quite sad for her. However, Every Day is more than a bittersweet love story - A''s experiences in different bodies also highlight how society perceives people based solely on their looks - whether they are fat or thin, white or black, rich or poor, and several of the bodies he inhabited were going through some incredibly tough situations, all of which A also experienced, and how other people reacted to those situations. And finally, if there wasn''t enough to love about this book, there''s David Levithan''s writing - it''s addictive, it''s beautiful, it''s moving and has definitely made a fan out of me. Some of my favourite quotes: ''''If there''s one thing I''ve learned, it''s this: We all want everything to be okay. We don''t even wish so much for fantastic or marvelous or outstanding. We will happily settle for okay, because most of the time, okay is enough.'''' ''''This is what love does: It makes you want to rewrite the world. It makes you want to choose the characters, build the scenery, guide the plot. The person you love sits across from you, and you want to do everything in your power to make it possible, endlessly possible. And when it''s just the two of you, alone in a room, you can pretend that this is how it is, this is how it will be.''''
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Derek Carney
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Clever concept, cleverly told
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 12, 2016
Clever concept, cleverly told. A, the main character here, wakes up every day in a different 16 year old body. A usually attempts to leave as little an impression on the person’s life for that day, until he meets Rhiannon. David Levithan’s concept is deceptively simple, and...See more
Clever concept, cleverly told. A, the main character here, wakes up every day in a different 16 year old body. A usually attempts to leave as little an impression on the person’s life for that day, until he meets Rhiannon. David Levithan’s concept is deceptively simple, and interwoven with a classic romance, works well on a number of levels. The Quantum Leap type scenario brings a freshness every few chapters as A changes bodies. Central to the themes of this story is an acceptance of whatever you are or choose to be as a person. The main love story is complemented by various subplots, which arise because of A’s constant body-swapping. The subplots deal with a range of subject such as obesity, gender, addiction to name a few. Levithan doesn’t attempt to explain why A changes bodies or how it all started, but the pace and urgency of the central narrative and a plethora of interesting characters mean the reader learns about A’s world organically, as he/she does. The author leaves practicalities aside occasionally in favour of returning to the main romance. Early on, you find yourself engaged with the character of A, and intrigued as to what will happen eventually, so the author does his job of hooking with ease here. A quick and easy read, with lots of issues tackled and topical messages on body image and acceptance of individuals imparted.
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E K
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s a good book, but not great...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 21, 2016
Against popular reviews, I didn''t particularly LOVE this book. I really did want to, but I just couldn''t. Heck I struggled to finish it. It took over six months for me to finish as I had so many breaks (I even read another book in between). The concept which Levithan came...See more
Against popular reviews, I didn''t particularly LOVE this book. I really did want to, but I just couldn''t. Heck I struggled to finish it. It took over six months for me to finish as I had so many breaks (I even read another book in between). The concept which Levithan came with, is great, and some of the many characters which he used to explore their own personal struggles is superb. He uses literature to attempt to breakdown some social construct for what it is to love another person (which in this case, is not bound by the gender or sexual orientation of the other person). Some of the characters were so real that it even made me start thinking of my own life and how I can relate to some of the characters. However, when it came to the actual narative, I thought it was extremely dull and not much was going on. The entire book was more like a collection of chapter-long short stories, and only a quarter of the book had anything to do with A and Rhiannon. The story between them could''ve have been told in about 10 chapters, and the story would still be the same; Boy meets girl. Boy falls in love with Girl. Girls falls in love with Boy. Problem is Boy doesn''t have a body of his own. And that''s the problem. So no I didn''t really enjoy the actual story too much, but I''m glad I finished it. P.S the Editor didn''t finish their job properly as there are many sentences with minor grammatical errors, or misplaced words. e.g "I don''t want to Rhiannon to see me like this."- yes, those were the exact words. And throughout the book, many sentences like those exists. So if you''re not fluent or a native of the language you''re reading it in, you''ll probably struggle to understand it.
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George Elliott
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Entertaining and engaging read but ultimately lacking a lot of substance
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 20, 2020
This book has an interesting premise. It keeps things fresh by introducing new characters each chapter, or what you might call new flavours of the same character. In essence it is a story about two people who want to be together. I found myself wanting more explanation than...See more
This book has an interesting premise. It keeps things fresh by introducing new characters each chapter, or what you might call new flavours of the same character. In essence it is a story about two people who want to be together. I found myself wanting more explanation than ''love will prevail'', which is how it develops and progresses. David Levithan uses his slightly haphazard storyline to give his two cents on a variety of issues from obesity to depression and gender stereotypes. Under a backdrop of teenage angst and scattered with various non committal side characters I found myself glued to its pages for the convenience and accessibility of the story.
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