Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale
Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale__front
Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale__after

Description

Product Description

A philosopher/mechanic''s wise (and sometimes funny) look at the challenges and pleasures of working with one''s hands 

"This is a deep exploration of craftsmanship by someone with real, hands-on knowledge. The book is also quirky, surprising, and sometimes quite moving." —Richard Sennett, author of The Craftsman


Called "the sleeper hit of the publishing season" by  The Boston GlobeShop Class as Soulcraft became an instant bestseller, attracting readers with its radical (and timely) reappraisal of the merits of skilled manual labor. On both economic and psychological grounds, author Matthew B. Crawford questions the educational imperative of turning everyone into a "knowledge worker," based on a misguided separation of thinking from doing. Using his own experience as an electrician and mechanic, Crawford presents a wonderfully articulated call for self-reliance and a moving reflection on how we can live concretely in an ever more abstract world.

Review

"It''s appropriate that [ Shop Class as Soulcraft] arrives in May, the month when college seniors commence real life. Skip Dr. Seuss, or a tie from Vineyard Vines, and give them a copy for graduation . . . . It''s not an insult to say that Shop Class is the best self-help book that I''ve ever read. Almost all works in the genre skip the "self" part and jump straight to the "help." Crawford rightly asks whether today''s cubicle dweller even has a respectable self . . . . It''s kind of like Heidegger and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance."  —Slate

"Matt Crawford''s remarkable book on the morality and metaphysics of the repairman looks into the reality of practical activity. It is a superb combination of testimony and reflection, and you can''t put it down." —Harvey Mansfield, Professor of Government, Harvard University

"Every once in a great while, a book will come along that''s brilliant and true and perfect for its time. Matthew B. Crawford''s Shop Class as Soulcraft is that kind of book, a prophetic and searching examination of what we''ve lost by ceasing to work with our hands-and how we can get it back. During this time of cultural anxiety and reckoning, when the conventional wisdom that has long driven our wealthy, sophisticated culture is foundering amid an economic and spiritual tempest, Crawford''s liberating volume appears like a lifeboat on the horizon." —Rod Dreher, author of Crunchy Cons: The New Conservative Counterculture and Its Return to Roots

"This is a deep exploration of craftsmanship by someone with real, hands-on knowledge. The book is also quirky, surprising, and sometimes quite moving."  —Richard Sennett, author of The Craftsman

"Matt Crawford has written a brave and indispensable book. By making a powerful case for the enduring value of the manual trades, Shop Class as Soulcraft offers a bracing alternative to the techno-babble that passes for conventional wisdom, and points the way to a profoundly necessary reconnection with the material world. No one who cares about the future of human work can afford to ignore this book." —Jackson Lears, Editor in Chief, Raritan

"We are on the verge of a national renewal. It will have more depth and grace if we read Crawford''s book carefully and take it to heart. He is a sharp theorist, a practicing mechanic, and a captivating writer." —Albert Borgmann, author of Real American Ethics

" Shop Class as Soulcraft is easily the most compelling polemic since The Closing of the American Mind. Crawford offers a stunning indictment of the modern workplace, detailing the many ways it deadens our senses and saps our vitality. And he describes how our educational system has done violence to our true nature as ''homo faber''. Better still, Crawford points in the direction of a richer, more fulfilling way of life. This is a book that will endure." —Reihan Salam, associate editor at The Atlantic, co-author of Grand New Party

"Crawford reveals the satisfactions of the active craftsman who cultivates his own judgment, rather than being a passive consumer subject to manipulated fantasies of individuality and creativity."  —Nathan Tarcov, Committee on Social Thought, University of Chicago

"Philosopher and motorcycle repair-shop owner Crawford extols the value of making and fixing things in this masterful paean to what he calls "manual competence," the ability to work with one''s hands. According to the author, our alienation from how our possessions are made and how they work takes many forms: the decline of shop class, the design of goods whose workings cannot be accessed by users (such as recent Mercedes models built without oil dipsticks) and the general disdain with which we regard the trades in our emerging "information economy." Unlike today''s "knowledge worker," whose work is often so abstract that standards of excellence cannot exist in many fields (consider corporate executives awarded bonuses as their companies sink into bankruptcy), the person who works with his or her hands submits to standards inherent in the work itself: the lights either turn on or they don''t, the toilet flushes or it doesn''t, the motorcycle roars or sputters. With wit and humor, the author deftly mixes the details of his own experience as a tradesman and then proprietor of a motorcycle repair shop with more philosophical considerations."  Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Philosopher and motorcycle mechanic Crawford presents a fascinating, important analysis of the value of hard work and manufacturing. He reminds readers that in the 1990s vocational education (shop class) started to become a thing of the past as U.S. educators prepared students for the "knowledge revolution." Thus, an entire generation of American "thinkers" cannot, he says, do anything, and this is a threat to manufacturing, the fundamental backbone of economic development. Crawford makes real the experience of working with one''s hands to make and fix things and the importance of skilled labor. His philosophical background is evident as he muses on how to live a pragmatic, concrete life in today''s ever more abstract world and issues a clarion call for reviving trade and skill development classes in American preparatory schools. The result is inspired social criticism and deep personal exploration. Crawford''s work will appeal to fans of Robert Pirsig''s classic Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance and should be required reading for all educational leaders. Highly recommended; Crawford''s appreciation for various trades may intrigue readers with white collar jobs who wonder at the end of each day what they really accomplished."  Library Journal

About the Author

Matthew B. Crawford is a philosopher and mechanic. He has a Ph.D. in political philosophy from the University of Chicago and served as a postdoctoral fellow on its Committee on Social Thought. Currently a fellow at the University of Virginia''s Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, he owns and operates Shockoe Moto, an independent motorcycle repair shop in Richmond, Virginia.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
963 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Amazonia
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Shallow and disappointing
Reviewed in the United States on April 13, 2018
I really wanted to like this book - all the way through the very last page as I forced myself to struggle to the end through the ramblings of the, "I believe in progressive republicanism." declaration. I even agree with much of what he has to say but...... See more
I really wanted to like this book - all the way through the very last page as I forced myself to struggle to the end through the ramblings of the, "I believe in progressive republicanism." declaration. I even agree with much of what he has to say but...

So much of the book is lost in the meandering of poor research, academics, wistful nostalgia for a past he never experienced and poorly formed arguments that it was hard to buy what he''s selling, even though I''m a returning customer. I found very little substance related to "soulcraft" throughout the text and frankly wished he''d spent more time sharing what he learned from the shop teachers and mentors he mentions but never fully explores. The constant switch from the dedication to craft and work in the trades as sometimes related but separate and at others equal in all ways is simply wrong and confusing. I hate to be the one to break the news but not everyone in the trades has any interest in mastery of craft or is a richer or more enlightened human from their work. The author posits that white collar work is devoid of all meaning and lacks the ability to measure self against product - which in itself is worth a whole discussion - but there many in the fields of labor that rise to excellence and personal mastery in the white collar ranks as well.

In the end, craftsmanship reflects the individual commitment to mastery and excellence and that isn''t recognized in this volume. Soul enriching craftsmanship isn''t found in the majority of workers regardless of profession and I was disappointed to find so little in this book that resonated with me - an already convinced believer that time in my shop is healing for my soul.
91 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More of what he complains about
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2018
An ironic 2-star that could have been 5-stars. Crawford desperately needs a better editor and someone to buy him a beer and share the hard fact that his book is just more of what he spends 200 pages bitching about. Sad part, he can write. The tiny minority of those 200... See more
An ironic 2-star that could have been 5-stars. Crawford desperately needs a better editor and someone to buy him a beer and share the hard fact that his book is just more of what he spends 200 pages bitching about. Sad part, he can write. The tiny minority of those 200 pages is insightful, compelling and memorable. The rest is precisely what he did, and accurately derides, as an abstractor at Information Access Company - poorly summarize others’ work without adding value. I doubt those who gave awards or glowing reviews (New York Mag, “spine-tingling’) did more than skim and assume the mix of academic end notes and first person grease monkey narrative meant this was fresh and insightful. I hope Crawford goes back and finds the 26 good pages and takes another shot. He has something to say and the skill to say it.
34 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Difficult to read unless you are a PhD.
Reviewed in the United States on January 8, 2019
I had high hope''s that this book would reinforce what I''ve said for 40 years , that trade classes are more valuable than much of the other things taught in school these days. I believe that is the gist of the book but I could only get through about a dozen pages before... See more
I had high hope''s that this book would reinforce what I''ve said for 40 years , that trade classes are more valuable than much of the other things taught in school these days.
I believe that is the gist of the book but I could only get through about a dozen pages before I had to quit reading it. I was disgusted at the way it was written using words not known to 99% of the population. The author, a PhD, must have spent hours researching a Thesuarus to find as many useless words as possible.
I am an educated person, and ther is no sense using $10 words like he did in a book about trade crafts. Had I known a PhD had written it, I might have thought twice about ordering it.
It is so disappointing that the way it is written smothers the message he was trying to convey. If his target audience was scholars, then he was probably successful in getting his point across. But a common person will get nothing out of it at all.
20 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
On Second Read, Arguments Fall Apart
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2021
On a first reading, this book''s argument is compelling. There''s something soul-crushing about white-collar, cubicle work, and Crawford''s observations make us feel that we are not alone in our suffering. But on second reading, problems begin to arise. Crawford... See more
On a first reading, this book''s argument is compelling. There''s something soul-crushing about white-collar, cubicle work, and Crawford''s observations make us feel that we are not alone in our suffering.

But on second reading, problems begin to arise. Crawford isn''t content to just extol the virtues of working with one''s hands; he has to ascribe a "morality" to this work and, conversely, insinuates an immorality to work that does not fit his model. Sadly, this is a morality that is only available to people privileged enough to make conscious life choices like Crawford was. (Note: Crawford can only make such choices because his parents--including a father whose academic work Crawford relentlessly mocks--afford him a comfortable starting point in life.) That morality isn''t available to the person who has to take a mind-numbing job just to feed a family. It''s also a morality that would seem unavailable to the sick or disabled. And Crawford''s focus is somewhat sexist as well. He sees no problem with the kind of sexist/homophobic talk that often takes places in the workspaces he privileges. Indeed, his focus is unwaveringly on men, so I''m not sure he''s given much thought at all to how the value of work applies outside of straight male minds.

If Crawford had simply focused on the psychological responses that reward working with our hands, it would have been a fine work. But when Crawford over-reaches and gets preachy, it falls apart. And Crawford seems to know that; that''s why he''s not content to simply extol manual labor but also spends a good deal of time tearing down theoretical/academic work like the kind his father did to raise a spoiled and privileged son.
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
not me
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
In Praise of Plumbing, or, Heidegger and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2014
I''ve read "Shop Class as Soulcraft" twice and have urged friends to read it, too. It''s a super-interesting book, which draws on autobiography, phenomenology, and labor studies to make the argument that the manual trades are cognitively and morally superior to most... See more
I''ve read "Shop Class as Soulcraft" twice and have urged friends to read it, too. It''s a super-interesting book, which draws on autobiography, phenomenology, and labor studies to make the argument that the manual trades are cognitively and morally superior to most white-collar "knowledge" work. Ironically, the argument is rather cerebral: the basic idea (or one of them anyway) is that manual workers are in touch with objective reality and must satisfy objective standards of excellence, whereas office workers spend much of their professional time managing perceptions of themselves. As someone who hated every hour I spent in an office drafting strategies, "talking points," and press guidance -- ephemeral performance art, at best -- the book spoke to me. (It also helped that I grew up in the SF Bay Area, like the author.)

Admittedly, the book has a few problems. As other Amazon reviewers have noted, the author makes sweeping generalizations on the basis of his two brief jobs in the "knowledge" sector and his readings of Jackall and Braverman. The book also has an underbaked, incomplete feel to it, as if the author had trouble working his ideas into a full-blown argument. And here and there there''s a hint of reverse snobbery, as when the author writes knowingly of race tracks and grimy machinery while never letting his audience (made up overwhelmingly of white-collar book readers) forget that he has a PhD from the University of Chicago. Perhaps this makes him the last Renaissance Man. (Perhaps he drinks Dos Equis, too.)

However, the book is definitely on to something. It will stir up reflection and self-recognition in anyone who reads it seriously. I''m looking forward to the author''s next work.
36 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Andrew Everett
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"The truth does not reveal itself to idle spectators.”
Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2018
This book is primarily about restoring honor to the manual trades. Crawford writes about the “rich cognitive challenges and psychic nourishment” that come with “the experience of making things and fixing things.” It makes sense to start with some context about... See more
This book is primarily about restoring honor to the manual trades. Crawford writes about the “rich cognitive challenges and psychic nourishment” that come with “the experience of making things and fixing things.”

It makes sense to start with some context about the author’s career path. “I started working as an electrician’s helper shortly before I turned fourteen… When I couldn’t get a job with my college degree in physics, I was glad to have something to fall back on, and went into business for myself.” Later, Crawford went back to school and earned a Ph.D. in political philosophy. He took a job as executive director of a think tank, but he found the work dispiriting. “Despite the beautiful ties I wore, it turned out to be a more proletarian existence than I had known as a manual worker.” After only five months, he quit and opened a motorcycle repair shop. “Perhaps most surprising, I often find manual work more engaging intellectually.”

“More than 90 percent of high school students ‘report that their guidance counselors encouraged them to go to college.’ … In this there is little accommodation of the diversity of dispositions, and of the fact that some very smart people are totally ill-suited both to higher education and to the kind of work you’re supposed to do once you have a degree. Further, funneling everyone into college creates certain perversities in the labor market.”

“It was in the 1990s that shop class started to become a thing of the past, as educators prepared students to become ‘knowledge workers’ … Meanwhile, people in the trades are constantly howling about their inability to find workers.”

Crawford writes about “the assembly line’s severing of the cognitive aspects of manual work from its physical execution. Such a partition from doing has bequeathed us the dichotomy of white collar versus blue collar, corresponding to mental versus manual… Yet there is evidence to suggest that the new frontier of capitalism lies in doing to office work what was previously done to factory work: draining it of its cognitive elements.” A recurring theme is the “stupidification” of various things.

“You can’t hammer a nail over the Internet… Princeton economist Alan Binder… finds 30 million to 40 million U.S. jobs to be potentially offshorable… MIT economist Frank Levy puts the issue not in terms of whether a service can be delivered electronically or not, but rather whether the service is itself rules-based or not.… Levy gestures toward an answer when he writes that ‘viewed from this rules-based perspective, creativity is knowing what to do when the rules run out or there are no rules in the first place. It is what a good auto mechanic does after his computerized test equipment says the car’s transmission is fine but the transmission continues to shift at the wrong engine speed.’”

“The degradation of work is often based on efforts to replace the intuitive judgments of practitioners with rule following… The crux of the idea of an intellectual technology is ‘the substitution of algorithms (problem-solving rules) for intuitive judgments.”

“But, in fact, it is often the case that when things get really hairy, you want an experienced human being in control… An experienced mechanic can intuit what is wrong… The basic idea of tacit knowledge is that we know more than we can say, and certainly more than we can specify in a formulaic way.”

“Some diagnostic situations contain so many variables, and symptoms can be so under-determining of causes, that explicit analytical reasoning comes up short. What is required then is the kind of judgment that arises only from experience; hunches rather than rules. I quickly realized there was more thinking going on in the bike shop than in my previous job at the think tank.”

“Often this sense making entails not so much problem solving as problem finding… The cognitive psychologists speak of ‘metacognition,’ which is the activity of stepping back and thinking about your own thinking. It is what you do when you stop for a moment in your pursuit of a solution, and wonder whether your understanding of the problem is adequate… The truth does not reveal itself to idle spectators.”

“In the real world, problems do not present themselves unambiguously. Piston slap may indeed sound like loose tappets, so to be a good mechanic you have to be constantly attentive to the possibility that you may be mistaken. This is an ethical virtue.”

“Fixing things, whether cars or human bodies, is very different from building things from scratch. The mechanic and the doctor deal with failure every day, even if they are expert, whereas the builder does not. This is because the things they fix are not of their own making, and are therefore never known in a comprehensive or absolute way. This experience of failure tempers the conceit of mastery… Fixing things may be a cure for narcissism.”

“Any discipline that deals with an authoritative, independent reality requires honesty and humility.”

“The master has no need for a psychology of persuasion that will make the apprentice compliant to whatever purposes the master might dream up; those purposes are given and determinate… On a crew, skill becomes the basis for a circle of mutual regard among those who recognize one another as peers, even across disciplines… This is the basis of which his submission to judgments of a master feel ennobling rather than debasing… Clear standards provide the basis for the solidarity of the crew, as opposed to the manipulative social relations of the office ‘team.’”

“Most people take pride in being good at something specific which happens through the accumulation of experience… You can’t buy entry to this world, you have to earn it”

“The satisfactions of manifesting oneself concretely in the world through manual competence [relieve man] of the felt need to offer chattering interpretations of himself to vindicate his worth. He can simply point: the building stands, the car now runs, the lights are on… His well-founded pride is far from the gratuitous ‘self-esteem’ that educators would impart to students, as though by magic.”

“It is common to locate one’s ‘true self’ in one’s leisure choices. Accordingly, good work is taken to be work that maximizes one’s means for pursuing these other activities, where life becomes meaningful. The mortgage broker works hard all year, then he goes and climbs Mount Everest… On the other hand, there are vocations that seem to offer a tighter connection between life and livelihood.”
4 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
MJM
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not light reading, but worth reading.
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2020
Just finished Shop Class as Soulcraft. Took my time, and found it quite worthwhile. Crawford mentions Pirsig''s book at some length, but it is not quite like Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. The book is a good discussion, in historic,... See more
Just finished Shop Class as Soulcraft. Took my time, and found it quite worthwhile.

Crawford mentions Pirsig''s book at some length, but it is not quite like Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

The book is a good discussion, in historic, economic, and political frameworks, of how work, particularly the manual trades, changed through the industrial revolution, as well as its effects on how education is conducted and valued.

It articulates pretty well the development in academia of a fascination with so-called "knowledge work," and challenges some of the pronouncements of one of its current champions, who happened to be a professor of mine in graduate school.

And, as a graduate school educated student of philosophy, practicing electrician, and motorcycle mechanic, Crawford anchors the discussion using examples from his diverse and often gritty personal experience. I found his approach refreshing. Both serious and entertaining.

On a personal level, it put into context my own diverse job/career choices over the years, which maybe were not as haphazard as I had imagined, or been led to believe.

Highly recommended for its practical treatment of the subject of work, as well as for offering an opportunity for some self discovery.
Helpful
Report
doctor_speed
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
New spin on an old story
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2021
I think that change is always hard to deal with and it''s good to get an opinion to consider. Sadly, this book is the same old story that you read when the rifle replaced the bow, when the car replaced the horse, CAD replaced the drafts person. Change is hard and... See more
I think that change is always hard to deal with and it''s good to get an opinion to consider.

Sadly, this book is the same old story that you read when the rifle replaced the bow, when the car replaced the horse, CAD replaced the drafts person. Change is hard and creates a new terrain that not everyone likes and some cannot adapt to. If you step off the (metaphorical) train, then you''re stuck at that station.

My gramma could not really grock TV and my mom found a VCR too complicated. Now, my it''s WIFI or Netflix.

This is a pretty common theme that is shared by many, but your time may be better spent reading a book that helps you master your current environment, rather than a book that glorifies days gone by.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

r
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
... most important books I''ve read this year (and the perfect complement to Zen & The Art Of Motorbike Maintenance
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2018
This may be one of the most important books I''ve read this year (and the perfect complement to Zen & The Art Of Motorbike Maintenance.) The author is both a philosopher and a mechanic and manages to merge together the two very different disciplines. It''s a book about work -...See more
This may be one of the most important books I''ve read this year (and the perfect complement to Zen & The Art Of Motorbike Maintenance.) The author is both a philosopher and a mechanic and manages to merge together the two very different disciplines. It''s a book about work - why we do it, how we derive meaning from it, the contrast between mental and manual work, and the psychological value of getting your hands dirty. Crawford points out that manual work has been unnecessarily labeled as inferior, or as the domain of unintelligent people. His argument is that working with your hands and seeing a physical manifestation of your efforts, can be truly fulfilling. His perspective is fascinating. I read this book feverishly, scribbling notes all over the margins as I went. Also, I recommend reading the notes section at the end (it is full of interesting tidbits and suggestions for further reading.)
4 people found this helpful
Report
AK
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance for the 21st century
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 4, 2011
Crawford''s book brings across a similar message to Pirsig''s Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - namely of the value of craft type work, and the intelligence required to go into it. In effect it is a renewed rallying call to devote more...See more
Crawford''s book brings across a similar message to Pirsig''s Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values - namely of the value of craft type work, and the intelligence required to go into it. In effect it is a renewed rallying call to devote more thought to one''s career than the blind obeisance to college and office work that seems to be the prevalent mode today. There is certainly a lot to be said for skilled craft work and the practitioners - the good ones, at least - can definitely boast of just as materially rich lives as white collar workers, and often have much more intrinsic satisfaction. The author does an excellent job to bring the pleasures of skilled physical work across, based primarily on his own experience (with some literary refferences thrown in for good measure). Where he falls somewhat short is in his description of white collar, office work - it seems that his own experience prepared him poorly to adequately describe and judge it. In the main points he is of course right but you will get a much better examination of both Taylorist management methods, as well as problems of white collar jobs in something like Matthew''s The Management Myth: Why the Experts Keep Getting it Wrong. At the end of the day the message transmitted is similar to Pirsig''s, and whether you prefer this book or the Zen original will probably depend on your age, and exposure to / liking of philosophy. Both use it copiously but Pirsig seems to rely on it more heavily, and he tells the whole (based on his real life, of course) more through a story - a road trip - rather than in the completely non-fictionalised account of Crawford. Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values also uses more complicated language and requires more concentration from the reader. Overall definitely a book worth reading to give you an added perspective, just do not expect a nation of motorcycle repair shop mechanics to be the cure to the current economic woes - even if it may well provide the solution to a disgruntled individual office worker.
One person found this helpful
Report
Aidan Nolan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
how his engineering of the production process was balanced by the engineering of consumption and easy credit to enslave workers
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 4, 2014
This book is well worth the effort needed to read it. It is not a lightweight holiday read... Early on the book is a little heavy but develops well and puts into perspective our industrial development. It shows how Henry Ford destroyed craftsmanship by separating thinking...See more
This book is well worth the effort needed to read it. It is not a lightweight holiday read... Early on the book is a little heavy but develops well and puts into perspective our industrial development. It shows how Henry Ford destroyed craftsmanship by separating thinking from doing; how his engineering of the production process was balanced by the engineering of consumption and easy credit to enslave workers to a life of unsatisfying work. Wind forward in time and see how the same creeping separation of thinking from doing is undermining the professional occupations, where graduates find themselves doing unsatisfying work in modern production-line offices. Individual flair, decisiveness and accountability is undermined by endless meetings where everyone is responsible and no one is responsible. Crawford points out the disconnects between modern life and the real world and shows how and why people can regain some meaning in their lives by working with their hands. If you want to read something that will make you think and re-evaluate how you spend your working life... Do yourself a favour, get yourself a copy, read it and think about the messages it contains. Who was it that said "The unexamined life is not worth living"? Incidentally, the book has nudged me into making a decision to change my job... by pursuing an aspect of my of my profession as a mechanical engineer which I have in the past enjoyed for its creativity. Need I say more..?
2 people found this helpful
Report
D.H.Ellison
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Is wood and metalwork obsolete in schools?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 8, 2021
If you would like to see a strong, still developing , craft department in English schools (Do pupils want them?) This is an interesting read . There are a few theoretical discussions and you will have to interpret them into English from American.
Report
Pat B
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not as good as the original essay
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 27, 2020
The original essay was great but I found the book to be a little long winded.
One person found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • culture and values
  • careers in music
  • building a business
  • motorcycle book
  • ship of the line
  • sociology of education

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale

Shop online Class as online Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work outlet sale