The high quality Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on discount Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living online sale

The high quality Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on discount Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living online sale

The high quality Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on discount Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living online sale
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From the team that brought you The Obstacle Is the Way and Ego Is the Enemy, a beautiful daily devotional of Stoic meditations—an instant Wall Street Journal and USA Today Bestseller.

Why have history''s greatest minds—from George Washington to Frederick the Great to Ralph Waldo Emerson, along with today''s top performers from Super Bowl-winning football coaches to CEOs and celebrities—embraced the wisdom of the ancient Stoics? Because they realize that the most valuable wisdom is timeless and that philosophy is for living a better life, not a classroom exercise.

The Daily Stoic offers 366 days of Stoic insights and exercises, featuring all-new translations from the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the playwright Seneca, or slave-turned-philosopher Epictetus, as well as lesser-known luminaries like Zeno, Cleanthes, and Musonius Rufus. Every day of the year you''ll find one of their pithy, powerful quotations, as well as historical anecdotes, provocative commentary, and a helpful glossary of Greek terms.

By following these teachings over the course of a year (and, indeed, for years to come) you''ll find the serenity, self-knowledge, and resilience you need to live well. 

Review

" The Daily Stoic follows up on the success of [ The Obstacle Is The Way] by providing a year of quotations and life lessons drawn from the three great Stoic sages.”
The Wall Street Journal

"Whether you''re a lowly cubicle slave or a US Senator, this book will help you find your still center."
Gregory Hays, translator of The Modern Library''s edition of Marcus Aurelius'' Meditations

"A generous gift of guidance on modern living culled from a canon of wisdom hatched long ago."
Maria Popova, editor of Brain Pickings

"A richly rewarding spring of practical wisdom to help you focus on what''s in your control, eliminate false and limiting beliefs, and take more effective action. Make  The Daily Stoic your guide and you will grow in clarity, effectiveness, and serenity each day!" 
Jack Canfield, co-author of  The Success Principles and the  Chicken Soup for the Soul®  series
 
" The Daily Stoic is a treasure for managing our choices, overcoming self-deception, and learning to act according to the true worth of things while keeping the common good always in view. Caring for the soul in this way makes not only better people, but a stronger society too." 
Joseph A. Maciariello, Professor Emeritus at The Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management; author of The Daily Drucker, The Effective Executive in Action, and  A Year with Peter Drucker 

" The Daily Stoic offers all who seek a calm, wise life a daily spiritual anchor. This book will keep you strong across dark times and steady and clear no matter what your circumstances happen to be. Keep this treasure close and it will care for you.”
Sharon Lebell, interpreter of The Art of Living by Epictetus

About the Author

Ryan Holiday is one of the world''s foremost thinkers and writers on ancient philosophy and its place in everyday life. He is a sought-after speaker, strategist, and the author of many bestselling books including  The Obstacle Is the WayEgo Is the EnemyThe Daily Stoic; and the #1  New York Times bestseller  Stillness Is the Key. His books have been translated into over 30 languages and read by over two million people worldwide. He lives outside Austin, Texas, with his family.
 
Stephen Hanselman has worked for more than three decades in publishing as a bookseller, publisher and literary agent. He is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School, where he received a master''s degree while also studying extensively in Harvard''s philosophy department. He lives with his family in South Orange, New Jersey.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

January 1st Control and Choice

"The chief task in life is simply this: to identify and separate matters so that I can say clearly to myself which are externals not under my control, and which have to do with the choices I actually control. Where then do I look for good and evil? Not to uncontrollable externals, but within myself to the choices that are my own . . ."

-Epictetus, Discourses, 2.5.4-5

The single most important practice in Stoic philosophy is differentiating between what we can change and what we can''t. What we have influence over and what we do not. A flight is delayed because of weather-no amount of yelling at an airline representative will end a storm. No amount of wishing will make you taller or shorter or born in a different country. No matter how hard you try, you can''t make someone like you. And on top of that, time spent hurling yourself at these immovable objects is time not spent on the things we can change.

The recovery community practices something called the Serenity Prayer: "God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference." Addicts cannot change the abuse suffered in childhood. They cannot undo the choices they have made or the hurt they have caused. But they can change the future-through the power they have in the present moment. As Epictetus said, they can control the choices they make right now.

The same is true for us today. If we can focus on making clear what parts of our day are within our control and what parts are not, we will not only be happier, we will have a distinct advantage over other people who fail to realize they are fighting an unwinnable battle.

January 2nd Education Is Freedom

"What is the fruit of these teachings? Only the most beautiful and proper harvest of the truly educated-tranquility, fearlessness, and freedom. We should not trust the masses who say only the free can be educated, but rather the lovers of wisdom who say that only the educated are free."

-Epictetus, Discourses, 2.1.21-23a

Why did you pick up this book? Why pick up any book? Not to seem smarter, not to pass time on the plane, not to hear what you want to hear-there are plenty of easier choices than reading.

No, you picked up this book because you are learning how to live. Because you want to be freer, fear less, and achieve a state of peace. Education-reading and meditating on the wisdom of great minds-is not to be done for its own sake. It has a purpose.

Remember that imperative on the days you start to feel distracted, when watching television or having a snack seems like a better use of your time than reading or studying philosophy. Knowledge-self-knowledge in particular-is freedom.

January 3rd Be Ruthless to the Things That Don''t Matter

"How many have laid waste to your life when you weren''t aware of what you were losing, how much was wasted in pointless grief, foolish joy, greedy desire, and social amusements-how little of your own was left to you. You will realize you are dying before your time!"

-Seneca, On the Brevity of Life, 3.3b

One of the hardest things to do in life is to say "No." To invitations, to requests, to obligations, to the stuff that everyone else is doing. Even harder is saying no to certain time-consuming emotions: anger, excitement, distraction, obsession, lust. None of these impulses feels like a big deal by itself, but run amok, they become a commitment like anything else.

If you''re not careful, these are precisely the impositions that will overwhelm and consume your life. Do you ever wonder how you can get some of your time back, how you can feel less busy? Start by learning the power of "No!"-as in "No, thank you," and "No, I''m not going to get caught up in that," and "No, I just can''t right now." It may hurt some feelings. It may turn people off. It may take some hard work.But the more you say no to the things that don''t matter, the more you can say yes to the things that do. This will let you live and enjoy your life-the life that you want.

January 4th The Big Three

"All you need are these: certainty of judgment in the present moment;

action for the common good in the present moment;

and an attitude of gratitude in the present moment for anything that comes your way."

-Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, 9.6

Perception, Action, Will. Those are the three overlapping but critical disciplines of Stoicism (as well as the organization of this book and yearlong journey you''ve just begun). There''s more to the philosophy certainly-and we could spend all day talking about the unique beliefs of the various Stoics: "This is what Heraclitus thought . . ." "Zeno is from Citium, a city in Cyprus, and he believed . . ." But would such facts really help you day to day? What clarity does trivia provide?

Instead, the following little reminder sums up the three most essential parts of Stoic philosophy worth carrying with you every day, into every decision:

Control your perceptions.

Direct your actions properly.

Willingly accept what''s outside your control.

That''s all we need to do.

January 5th Clarify Your Intentions

"Let all your efforts be directed to something, let it keep that end in view. It''s not activity that disturbs people, but false conceptions of things that drive them mad."

-Seneca, On Tranquility of Mind, 12.5

Law 29 of The 48 Laws of Power is: Plan All The Way To The End. Robert Greene writes, "By planning to the end you will not be overwhelmed by circumstances and you will know when to stop. Gently guide fortune and help determine the future by thinking far ahead." The second habit in The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is: begin with an end in mind.

Having an end in mind is no guarantee that you''ll reach it-no Stoic would tolerate that assumption-but not having an end in mind is a guarantee you won''t. To the Stoics, oi?sis (false conceptions) are responsible not just for disturbances in the soul but for chaotic and dysfunctional lives and operations. When your efforts are not directed at a cause or a purpose, how will you know what to do day in and day out? How will you know what to say no to and what to say yes to? How will you know when you''ve had enough, when you''ve reached your goal, when you''ve gotten off track, if you''ve never defined what those things are?

The answer is that you cannot. And so you are driven into failure-or worse, into madness by the oblivion of directionlessness.

January 6th Where, Who, What, and Why

"A person who doesn''t know what the universe is, doesn''t know where they are. A person who doesn''t know their purpose in life doesn''t know who they are or what the universe is. A person who doesn''t know any one of these things doesn''t know why they are here. So what to make of people who seek or avoid the praise of those who have no knowledge of where or who they are?"

-Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, 8.52

The late comedian Mitch Hedberg had a funny story he told in his act. Sitting down for an on-air interview, a radio DJ asked him, "So, who are you?" In that moment, he had to think, Is this guy really deep or did I drive to the wrong station?

How often are we asked a simple question like "Who are you?" or "What do you do?" or "Where are you from?" Considering it a superficial question-if we even consider it at all-we don''t bother with more than a superficial answer.

But, gun to their head, most people couldn''t give much in the way of a substantive answer. Could you? Have you taken the time to get clarity about who you are and what you stand for? Or are you too busy chasing unimportant things, mimicking the wrong influences, and following disappointing or unfulfilling or nonexistent paths?

January 7th Seven Clear Functions of the Mind

"The proper work of the mind is the exercise of choice, refusal, yearning, repulsion, preparation, purpose, and assent. What then can pollute and clog the mind''s proper functioning? Nothing but its own corrupt decisions."

-Epictetus, Discourses, 4.11.6-7

Let''s break down each one of those tasks:

Choice-to do and think right

Refusal-of temptation

Yearning-to be better

Repulsion-of negativity, of bad influences, of what isn''t true

Preparation-for what lies ahead or whatever may happen

Purpose-our guiding principle and highest priority

Assent-to be free of deception about what''s inside and outside our control (and be ready to accept the latter)

This is what the mind is here to do. We must make sure that it does-and see everything else as pollution or a corruption.

January 8th Seeing Our Addictions

"We must give up many things to which we are addicted, considering them to be good. Otherwise, courage will vanish, which should continually test itself. Greatness of soul will be lost, which can''t stand out unless it disdains as petty what the mob regards as most desirable.

-Seneca, Moral Letters, 74.12b-13

What we consider to be harmless indulgences can easily become full-blown addictions. We start with coffee in the morning, and soon enough we can''t start the day without it. We check our email because it''s part of our job, and soon enough we feel the phantom buzz of the phone in our pocket every few seconds. Soon enough, these harmless habits are running our lives.

The little compulsions and drives we have not only chip away at our freedom and sovereignty, they cloud our clarity. We think we''re in control-but are we really? As one addict put it, addiction is when we''ve "lost the freedom to abstain." Let us reclaim that freedom.

What that addiction is for you can vary: Soda? Drugs? Complaining? Gossip? The Internet? Biting your nails? But you must reclaim the ability to abstain because within it is your clarity and self-control.

January 9th What We Control and What We Don''t

"Some things are in our control, while others are not. We control our opinion, choice, desire, aversion, and, in a word, everything of our own doing. We don''t control our body, property, reputation, position, and, in a word, everything not of our own doing. Even more, the things in our control are by nature free, unhindered, and unobstructed, while those not in our control are weak, slavish, can be hindered, and are not our own."

-Epictetus, Enchiridion, 1.1-2

Today, you won''t control the external events that happen. Is that scary? A little, but it''s balanced when we see that we can control our opinion about those events. You decide whether they''re good or bad, whether they''re fair or unfair. You don''t control the situation, but you control what you think about it.

See how that works? Every single thing that is outside your control-the outside world, other people, luck, karma, whatever-still presents a corresponding area that is in your control. This alone gives us plenty to manage, plenty of power.

Best of all, an honest understanding of what is within our control provides real clarity about the world: all we have is our own mind. Remember that today when you try to extend your reach outward-that it''s much better and more appropriately directed inward.

January 10th If You Want to Be Steady

"The essence of good is a certain kind of reasoned choice; just as the essence of evil is another kind. What about externals, then? They are only the raw material for our reasoned choice, which finds its own good or evil in working with them. How will it find the good? Not by marveling at the material! For if judgments about the material are straight that makes our choices good, but if those judgments are twisted, our choices turn bad."

-Epictetus, Discourses, 1.29.1-3

The Stoics seek steadiness, stability, and tranquility-traits most of us aspire to but seem to experience only fleetingly. How do they accomplish this elusive goal? How does one embody eustatheia (the word Arrian used to describe this teaching of Epictetus)?

Well, it''s not luck. It''s not by eliminating outside influences or running away to quiet and solitude. Instead, it''s about filtering the outside world through the straightener of our judgment. That''s what our reason can do-it can take the crooked, confusing, and overwhelming nature of external events and make them orderly.

However, if our judgments are crooked because we don''t use reason, then everything that follows will be crooked, and we will lose our ability to steady ourselves in the chaos and rush of life. If you want to be steady, if you want clarity, proper judgment is the best way.

January 11th If You Want to Be Unsteady

"For if a person shifts their caution to their own reasoned choices and the acts of those choices, they will at the same time gain the will to avoid, but if they shift their caution away from their own reasoned choices to things not under their control, seeking to avoid what is controlled by others, they will then be agitated, fearful, and unstable."

-Epictetus, Discourses, 2.1.12

The image of the Zen philosopher is the monk up in the green, quiet hills, or in a beautiful temple on some rocky cliff. The Stoics are the antithesis of this idea. Instead, they are the man in the marketplace, the senator in the Forum, the brave wife waiting for her soldier to return from battle, the sculptor busy in her studio. Still, the Stoic is equally at peace.

Epictetus is reminding you that serenity and stability are results of your choices and judgment, not your environment. If you seek to avoid all disruptions to tranquility-other people, external events, stress-you will never be successful. Your problems will follow you wherever you run and hide. But if you seek to avoid the harmful and disruptive judgments that cause those problems, then you will be stable and steady wherever you happen to be.

January 12th The One Path to Serenity

"Keep this thought at the ready at daybreak, and through the day and night-there is only one path to happiness, and that is in giving up all outside of your sphere of choice, regarding nothing else as your possession, surrendering all else to God and Fortune."

-Epictetus, Discourses, 4.4.39

This morning, remind yourself of what is in your control and what''s not in your control. Remind yourself to focus on the former and not the latter.

Before lunch, remind yourself that the only thing you truly possess is your ability to make choices (and to use reason and judgment when doing so). This is the only thing that can never be taken from you completely.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Smiley
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You can''t rely on 5 star ratings with books...
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2019
Stoicism is wonderful. This is a good book for people at or around 15 years of age. If you are an adult and have not read much (and are being honest with yourself) throughout your life, then ok, give it a crack. However, I found this book to be VERY basic and extremely... See more
Stoicism is wonderful. This is a good book for people at or around 15 years of age. If you are an adult and have not read much (and are being honest with yourself) throughout your life, then ok, give it a crack. However, I found this book to be VERY basic and extremely lacking in any meaningful or semi-original analysis of stoicism. Plainly put, each page is a 1-3 sentence, stoic quote, from one of the "greats," out of context. The explanation which follows is not very thought provoking, original or helpful- in my opinion. This may be a good book, however, for your high schooler who is in competitive sports or stuck in social media-life.
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Helen Williams
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Feels amateurish
Reviewed in the United States on March 7, 2019
I’m confused by the good reviews on this book. I will say that some of the author’s comments are good enough to assist the reader in their own reflection, but most are plain, lacking insight, and feel rushed...and some are just stupid. Take February 8th for example, where... See more
I’m confused by the good reviews on this book. I will say that some of the author’s comments are good enough to assist the reader in their own reflection, but most are plain, lacking insight, and feel rushed...and some are just stupid. Take February 8th for example, where the author says “The next time someone gets upset near you - crying, yelling, breaking something, being pointed or cruel - watch how quickly this statement will stop them cold: ‘I hope this is making you feel better.’ Because, of course, it isn’t.” Face palm. There is nothing remotely Stoic about responding with sarcasm to someone who is upset.

I like the structure and premise behind the book so much that I keep wanting it to get better. But I can’t help but feel like I’m reading the musings of an amateur.
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Lone WOlf
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The ultimate philosphy of Coping
Reviewed in the United States on March 15, 2018
I have been a fitness nut all my life, yet last year a combination of a reaction prescription drugs and latent back problems landed me on crutches...two back surgeries, 9 months now of physical therapy and still walking on two canes. Half of each day is spent in physical t... See more
I have been a fitness nut all my life, yet last year a combination of a reaction prescription drugs and latent back problems landed me on crutches...two back surgeries, 9 months now of physical therapy and still walking on two canes. Half of each day is spent in physical t herapy, and no one knows whether nerve damage will recover. I have my own consulting business, and I have avoided face to face meetings for fear of the reaction of clients and competitors to my physical infirmities...loss of business, loss of income, loss of lifestyle, loss of image, on and on. It was all getting deep into my head. Last week I heard Barry Ritholz on Bloomberg interview Ryan Holiday and discuss this book, which I promptly purchased. It has helped immensely in a single week to refocus and avoid a total flame out. I read the Stoics in college and later, but they never "spoke to me" like they do now. It is fundamentally a philosophy of coping. I still hang on to Charles Spurgeon, but so much of that is about what comes later; I needed something to help me with today. Interestingly, in reading through it (and half a dozen others I purchased since then), I have pondered how much we have drifted from our Graeco-Western traditions. The Founding Fathers were steeped in this stuff, but somewhere along the way we have all become tethered to the whims of feelings, including other''s feelings, and the Stoics had the solution to these thousands of years ago. I can''t control those, and so I don''t allocate my precious limited resources to them. So I work around them. Adapt. The Media in this country inundates us with such distraction (the topic of another book by this author, which I also bought). What would a Stoic say to someone who says they "don''t feel safe?" Probably tell them to take action within their control to be safe and give up on demanding that the entire world respond out of guilt, badgering or whatever to appease your feelings. And then the Stoic would get on about his business.

Its a great, and dangerous, little book. Thank you, Mr. Holiday, for bringing it back in an easily digestible format.
305 people found this helpful
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10 Cent Traveler
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I do not recommend this book
Reviewed in the United States on October 12, 2019
It''s been almost 6 months of daily reading and this book is still not what I had hoped. The flow is poor and the lessons come off more as being written by someone who just wanted to put together a book. I commend the marketing, but the product is thrash. I won''t even pass... See more
It''s been almost 6 months of daily reading and this book is still not what I had hoped. The flow is poor and the lessons come off more as being written by someone who just wanted to put together a book. I commend the marketing, but the product is thrash. I won''t even pass the book on for fear someone might get a hold of it as their first glimpse of Stoicism and be turned off. I do not recommend this book.
123 people found this helpful
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EMCornett
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I would recommend it to anyone
Reviewed in the United States on August 14, 2017
I was looking for a book that was similar to a devotional without the religious aspect. I also wanted a daily reminder of mindfulness, awareness, philosophy, meditation, and thought. This book is exactly what I was looking for. I would recommend it to anyone.
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Dawn Casey Rowe
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Prescription for Better Living
Reviewed in the United States on October 18, 2016
I grew up with my mom’s daily meditation book on an end table in our living room. The spine was broken, pages browned, a tasseled bookmark showed the date as reliably as my iPhone. She still reads it every day. "The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom,... See more
I grew up with my mom’s daily meditation book on an end table in our living room. The spine was broken, pages browned, a tasseled bookmark showed the date as reliably as my iPhone. She still reads it every day.

"The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Daily Living" is the meditation book my son will remember, the one I''ll read every day. It''s now on my end table with a red ribbon marking the season.

The Daily Stoic isn’t simply a book to make me think, it’s an action guide, a “prescription for handling ourselves and our actions in the world.” The great Stoics remind me never to be satisfied with learning--I must always be doing. In order to lead a successful life, I must practice cutting through distractions and desires to get to things that matter.

That’s the only way to become a better human being. That’s the call to action I’m getting from this book--you will, too.

In "The Daily Stoic," Stephen Hanselman and Ryan Holiday have curated works by the great Stoic philosophers--Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, weaving in modern thinkers and situations I can use immediately. Each month has a specific theme such as clarity, right action, duty, awareness, and problem solving. Lessons build on prior themes, creating an easy-to-use teaching tool out of philosophers that can often be overwhelming.

I love this book for its excellent translations and applicable life lessons. Each meditation has just enough to challenge me and help me feel I can put the thoughts into action today.
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Thomas M. Loarie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Buck Up
Reviewed in the United States on November 20, 2016
Ryan Holiday is a best-selling author (“Trust Me I’m Lying,” “Ego is the Enemy,” “The Obstacle is the Way”) and a blogger. He brands himself as someone focused on life, dealing with idiots, how to be self-critical and self-aware, humility, philosophy, reading and... See more
Ryan Holiday is a best-selling author (“Trust Me I’m Lying,” “Ego is the Enemy,” “The Obstacle is the Way”) and a blogger. He brands himself as someone focused on life, dealing with idiots, how to be self-critical and self-aware, humility, philosophy, reading and strategy.

I became aware of Holliday when I read and reviewed his thoughtful and helpful book “The Obstacle is the Way.” It is a book about stoicism, the ancient Greek philosophy and its principles, which has sold more than 100,000 copies and has been translated into 17 languages. Stoicism is an ancient Hellenistic philosophic school founded in Athens that promoted the daily management of self. It teaches 1) that virtue, the highest good, is based on knowledge, and 2) that the wise live in harmony with the divine Reason (also identified with Fate and Providence) that governs nature. These principles are indifferent to the vicissitudes of fortune and to pleasure and pain.

Some will be familiar to readers, others will not:

o Seize life and take advantage of it.
o If you seek tranquility, do less.
o It can ruin your life only if it ruined your character. Otherwise, it cannot harm you – inside or out.
o Do what we can, endure and bear what we must.
o None of what we do lasts, no matter how clever or brilliant.
o So if we throw out other people’s recognition, what is left for us to prize?

Stoics include Marcus Aurelius, Cicero, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Viktor Frankle, Ruben Carter, Ulysses S Grant, Thomas Jefferson, Napoleon, Churchill, Steve Jobs, Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll, Cub’s Manager Joe Maddon, and thousands more.

“Stoicism as a philosophy is really about the mental game,” Holiday says. “It is not a set of ethics or principles. It is a collection of spiritual exercises designed to help people through the difficulty of life by managing emotion; specifically, non-helpful emotion.”

In “Daily Stoic,” Holiday provides 366 daily meditations on wisdom, perseverance, and the art of living. He provides a year of quotations and life lessons drawn from the three great Stoic sages -Seneca the Younger, Epictetus (a freed slave) and Emperor Marcus Aurelius. The meditations are organized under three primary topics (similar to those in “The Obstacle is…”) “The Discipline of Perception,” “The Discipline of Action,” and the “Discipline of Will.” Each topic is further divided into monthly themes: “Clarity,” “Passions and Emotions,” “Awareness,” “Unbiased Thought,” “Right Action,” “Problem Solving,” “Duty”“Pragmatism,” “Fortitude and Resilience,” “Virtue and Kindness,” “Acceptance,” and “Meditations on Mortality.”

Paul Tillich noted that Stoicism is “the only real alternative to Christianity in the Western world.” It came to many of the same conclusions about how to think and live. Both are characterized by:

 An emphasis on hardship.
 A sense of man’s depravity and a constant self-examination
 An inner freedom from the world.
 An aversion to excess.

The goal of Stoicism is to attain inner peace. The meditations of the “Daily Stoic” can be a help in overcoming adversity, practicing self-control, being conscious of our impulses, realizing how short life is and making the most of it. The principles within Stoicism are, perhaps, the most relevant and practical sets of rules for those who choose to embrace the obstacles of life. They are the tools that are immediately practical to our current endeavors.

Thought-provoking, soul-searching exercises are included with each daily meditation. “The Daily Stoic” is an excellent way to begin or end each day.
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Lgfranks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Get the Hardback Edition for True Daily Reading!
Reviewed in the United States on July 18, 2017
I love everything about this book. I''ve been a fan of Ryan''s writing for quite a while, and consider him a mentor through the written word at this point. What''s great about this format is the daily format. I start off my entire day with a few minutes of wisdom... See more
I love everything about this book.
I''ve been a fan of Ryan''s writing for quite a while, and consider him a mentor through the written word at this point.
What''s great about this format is the daily format. I start off my entire day with a few minutes of wisdom from the Stoic masters, and it literally helps me have a better day. I''m more mindful, focused, and thoughtful. I''m more of a Stoic.
I bought this on the Kindle and hardback--and I definitely appreciate the hardback version more. It''s obviously designed for day-to-day reading, and has a very handy ribbon/bookmark attached to it. I also love taking notes as I''m reading, and write down an intention that I have for the day based on the writing.
This is a brilliant book, and I''m grateful to Ryan and Stephen for taking the time to write this and bless my life. Well, well worth the money...and I plan on buying many more copies to give to friends, as well (I''ve only given away one to this point).
48 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Rob Francis
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s in English but....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 28, 2019
In theory the Daily Stoic Meditations and Daily Stoic Journal are a fantastic idea. Though they are in English they are firmly aimed at a US audience. They are full of references to Lincoln, Washington and other individuals from the short history of the United States. This...See more
In theory the Daily Stoic Meditations and Daily Stoic Journal are a fantastic idea. Though they are in English they are firmly aimed at a US audience. They are full of references to Lincoln, Washington and other individuals from the short history of the United States. This is jarring and an annoyance. With a wealth of history to choose from it''s a shame that the author was unable to find better common reference points for English speakers.
235 people found this helpful
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Mr. Richard Mabe
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A book of useful real world wisdom built for action taking and overcoming destructive emotions.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 15, 2018
I am a new comer to the Stoics but from study so far I have found much to admire about their philosophy. The 366 meditations offer a page a day of stoic wisdom. No complaints so far it''s all been good stuff, some has made me think again and been helpful. I think I am going...See more
I am a new comer to the Stoics but from study so far I have found much to admire about their philosophy. The 366 meditations offer a page a day of stoic wisdom. No complaints so far it''s all been good stuff, some has made me think again and been helpful. I think I am going to like stoicism. The Stoics had the view that life can be very difficult! Stoicism has just a few central teachings. It sets out to remind us of how unpredictable the world can be. How brief our moment of life is. How to be steadfast, and strong, and in control of yourself. And finally, that the source of our dissatisfaction lies in our impulsive dependency on our reflexive senses rather than logic. Stoicism doesn’t concern itself with complicated theories about the world, but with helping us overcome destructive emotions and act on what can be acted upon. It’s built for action, not endless debate. Stoics take time each day to look inwards and reflect on our shortcomings and review how the day went and see if there is anything we could have done better. Doing this daily helps us to refine our habits towards what we really want to do with our lives, pushes us to do more and see obstacles as something to be overcome. I havent made a huge study of the stoics yet but what I have discovered has been good and is helping me to give life direction and feel a sense of purpose. I already feel more in control and satisfied because of it.
120 people found this helpful
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Mr. Cholmondley Warner
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I took a Stoic view when I ordered this.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 30, 2019
I discovered Stoicism through reading Tom Wolfe''s ''A Man in Full''. That''s a really good read so I won''t go into detail because of spoilers. This book is more self-help than all the other self-help books put together. It''s not ''preachy'' just practical. The format is a ideal....See more
I discovered Stoicism through reading Tom Wolfe''s ''A Man in Full''. That''s a really good read so I won''t go into detail because of spoilers. This book is more self-help than all the other self-help books put together. It''s not ''preachy'' just practical. The format is a ideal. Each day of the year has a quote from a famous Stoic and brief comment on the quote. It doesn''t tell you ''do this and that will happen''. It asks you to ask questions of yourself. Two or three minutes reading in the morning and a whole day of thinking. You will get out of this what you put into it. If you''re new to Stoicism the views may surprise you. If you''re an old hand Stoic it''s a great way to start the day. This book could change your life. To what degree is up to you.
44 people found this helpful
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VeryMetal
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life is something you “get” to do.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 16, 2019
Sometimes with the pace, pressures and constant distractions of daily modern life, you need to be sat down and reminded of some common sense. In this book grandads Seneca, Epictetus and grumpy uncle Marcus will give it to you straight. In their day it really was tough. I...See more
Sometimes with the pace, pressures and constant distractions of daily modern life, you need to be sat down and reminded of some common sense. In this book grandads Seneca, Epictetus and grumpy uncle Marcus will give it to you straight. In their day it really was tough. I read this book everyday and it has been a springboard into further philosophical research, something I’d never have previously considered. I recommend this book to everyone, it benefited an angry, frustrated misery like me enormously. Imagine what it could do for you.
39 people found this helpful
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R. Bagley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great daily read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 16, 2017
Love it, it''s the book I reach for when I get out of bed helps me shape my day and put me in the right mindset. I brilliant daily guide to living in a calm and stoic way. It''s not about being emotionally cut off it''s just about doing what is best rather than what your...See more
Love it, it''s the book I reach for when I get out of bed helps me shape my day and put me in the right mindset. I brilliant daily guide to living in a calm and stoic way. It''s not about being emotionally cut off it''s just about doing what is best rather than what your emotions dictate
33 people found this helpful
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