The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

Description

Product Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The author of The Talent Code unlocks the secrets of highly successful groups and provides tomorrow’s leaders with the tools to build a cohesive, motivated culture.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BLOOMBERG AND LIBRARY JOURNAL

Where does great culture come from? How do you build and sustain it in your group, or strengthen a culture that needs fixing?

In The Culture Code, Daniel Coyle goes inside some of the world’s most successful organizations—including the U.S. Navy’s SEAL Team Six, IDEO, and the San Antonio Spurs—and reveals what makes them tick. He demystifies the culture-building process by identifying three key skills that generate cohesion and cooperation, and explains how diverse groups learn to function with a single mind. Drawing on examples that range from Internet retailer Zappos to the comedy troupe Upright Citizens Brigade to a daring gang of jewel thieves, Coyle offers specific strategies that trigger learning, spark collaboration, build trust, and drive positive change. Coyle unearths helpful stories of failure that illustrate what not to do, troubleshoots common pitfalls, and shares advice about reforming a toxic culture. Combining leading-edge science, on-the-ground insights from world-class leaders, and practical ideas for action, The Culture Code offers a roadmap for creating an environment where innovation flourishes, problems get solved, and expectations are exceeded.

Culture is not something you are—it’s something you do. The Culture Code puts the power in your hands. No matter the size of your group or your goal, this book can teach you the principles of cultural chemistry that transform individuals into teams that can accomplish amazing things together.

Praise for The Culture Code

“I’ve been waiting years for someone to write this book—I’ve built it up in my mind into something extraordinary. But it is even better than I imagined. Daniel Coyle has produced a truly brilliant, mesmerizing read that demystifies the magic of great groups. It blows all other books on culture right out of the water.” —Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Option B, Originals, and Give and Take

“If you want to understand how successful groups work—the signals they transmit, the language they speak, the cues that foster creativity—you won’t find a more essential guide than The Culture Code.” —Charles Duhigg, New York Times bestselling author of The Power of Habit and Smarter Faster Better

Review

Advance praise for The Culture Code

“I’ve been waiting years for someone to write this book—I’ve built it up in my mind into something extraordinary. But it is even better than I imagined. Daniel Coyle has produced a truly brilliant, mesmerizing read that demystifies the magic of great groups. It blows all other books on culture right out of the water. Read it immediately.” —Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Option B, Originals, and Give and Take
 
“If you want to understand how successful groups work—the signals they transmit, the language they speak, the cues that foster creativity—you won’t find a more essential guide than The Culture Code. This book is a marvel of insight and practicality.” —Charles Duhigg, New York Times bestselling author of The Power of Habit and Smarter Faster Better
 
The Culture Code is a step-by-step guidebook to building teams that are not just more effective but happier. Whether you lead a team or are a team member, this book is a must-read.” —Laszlo Bock, CEO of Humu, former SVP of People Operations at Google, and author of Work Rules!
 
“Daniel Coyle has a gift for demystifying elite performance and breaking it down into empirical facts. This is indispensable for anyone looking to lead, build, or find an elite culture.” —Rich Diviney, retired Navy SEAL Officer and director of outreach for the Barry-Wehmiller Leadership Institute

“There are profound ideas on every single page, stories that will change the way you work, the way you lead, and the impact you have on the world. Highly recommended, an urgent read.” —Seth Godin, author of Linchpin

About the Author

Daniel Coyle is the New York Times bestselling author of The Talent Code, The Little Book of Talent, The Secret Race, Lance Armstrong’s War, and Hardball: A Season in the Projects. Coyle, who works as an advisor to the Cleveland Indians, lives in Cleveland, Ohio, during the school year and in Homer, Alaska, during the summer with his wife, Jen, and their four children.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

 
Introduction When Two Plus Two Equals Ten
 
Let’s start with a question, which might be the oldest ques- tion of all: Why do certain groups add up to be greater than the sum of their parts, while others add up to be less?
A few years ago the designer and engineer Peter Skillman held a competition to find out. Over several months, he as- sembled a series of four-person groups at Stanford, the Uni- versity of California, the University of Tokyo, and a few other places. He challenged each group to build the tallest possible structure using the following items:
 
•  twenty pieces of uncooked spaghetti
•  one yard of transparent tape
•  one yard of string
•  one standard-size marshmallow
 
The contest had one rule: The marshmallow had to end   up on top. The fascinating part of the experiment, however, had less to do with the task than with the participants. Some of the teams consisted of business school students. The oth- ers consisted of kindergartners.
The business students got right to work. They began talk- ing and thinking strategically. They examined the materials.

They tossed ideas back and forth  and  asked  thoughtful,  avvy questions. They generated several options, then honed he most promising ideas. It was professional, rational, and ntelligent. The process resulted in a decision to pursue one particular strategy. Then they divided up the tasks  and  tarted building.
The kindergartners took a different approach. They  did not strategize. They did not analyze or share experiences. They did not ask questions, propose options, or hone ideas.   n fact, they barely talked at all.  They  stood  very  close  to one another. Their interactions were not smooth or orga- nized. They abruptly grabbed materials from one another  and started building, following no plan or  strategy.  When hey spoke, they spoke in short bursts: “Here! No,  here!”  Their entire technique might be described as trying a bunch of stuff together.
If you had to bet which of the teams would win, it would not be a difficult choice. You would bet on the business school tudents, because they possess the intelligence, skills, and ex- perience to do a superior job. This is the way we normally hink about group performance. We presume skilled individ- uals will combine to produce skilled performance in the same way we presume two plus two will combine to produce four. Your bet would be wrong. In dozens of trials, kindergart- ners built structures that averaged twenty-six inches tall, while business school students built structures that averaged
ess than ten inches.*
 
Teams of kindergartners also defeated teams of lawyers (who built towers hat averaged fifteen inches) as well as teams of CEOs (twenty-two inches).

The result is hard to absorb because it feels like an illusion. We see smart, experienced business school  students, and we find it difficult to imagine that they would combine to produce a poor performance. We see unsophisticated, inexperienced kindergartners, and we find it difficult to imagine that they would combine to produce a successful perfor- mance. But this illusion, like every illusion, happens because our instincts have led us to focus on the wrong details. We focus on what we can see—individual skills. But individual skills are not what matters. What matters is the interaction. The business school students appear to be collaborating, but in fact they are engaged in a process psychologists call status management. They are figuring out where they fit into the larger picture: Who is in charge? Is it okay to criticize someone’s idea? What are the rules here? Their interactions appear smooth, but their  underlying  behavior is  riddled with inefficiency, hesitation, and subtle competition. Instead of focusing on the task, they are navigating their uncertainty about one another. They spend so much time managing sta- tus that they fail to grasp the essence of the problem (the marshmallow is relatively heavy, and the spaghetti is hard to secure). As a result, their first efforts often collapse, and they
run out of time.
The actions of the kindergartners appear disorganized on the surface. But when you view them as a single entity, their behavior is efficient and effective. They are not competing  for status. They stand shoulder to shoulder and work ener- getically together. They move quickly,  spotting  problems  and offering help. They experiment, take risks, and notice outcomes, which guides them toward effective solutions.

The kindergartners succeed not because they are smarter but because they work together in a smarter way. They are apping into a simple and powerful method in which a group of ordinary people can create a performance far beyond the um of their parts.
This book is the story of how that method works.
 
Group culture is one of the most powerful forces on the planet. We sense its presence inside successful businesses, hampionship teams, and thriving families, and we sense when it’s absent or toxic. We can measure its impact on the bottom line. (A strong culture increases net income 756 percent over eleven years, according to a Harvard study of more han two hundred companies.) Yet the inner workings of ulture remain mysterious. We all want strong culture in our organizations, communities, and families. We all know that t works. We just don’t know quite how it works.
The reason may be based in the way we think about cul- ure. We tend to think about it as a group trait, like DNA. Strong, well-established cultures like those of Google, Dis- ney, and the Navy SEALs feel so singular and distinctive that hey seem fixed, somehow predestined. In this way of think- ng, culture is a possession determined by fate. Some groups have the gift of strong culture; others don’t.
This book takes a different approach. I spent the last four years visiting and researching eight of the world’s most suc- essful groups, including a special-ops military unit, an nner-city school, a professional basketball team, a movie studio, a comedy troupe, a gang of jewel thieves, and others.* I found that their cultures are created by a specific set of skills. These skills, which tap into the power of our social brains to create interactions exactly like the ones used by the kindergartners building the spaghetti tower, form the structure of this book. Skill 1—Build Safety—explores how signals of connection generate bonds of belonging and iden- tity. Skill 2—Share Vulnerability—explains how habits of mutual risk drive trusting cooperation. Skill 3—Establish Purpose tells how narratives create shared goals and values. The three skills work together from the bottom up, first building group connection and then channeling it into ac- tion. Each part of the book is structured like a tour: We’ll first explore how each skill works, and then we’ll go into the field to spend time with groups and leaders who use these methods every day. Each part will end with a collection of concrete suggestions on applying these skills to your group. In the following pages, we’ll spend time inside some of the planet’s top-performing cultures and see what makes them tick. We’ll take a look inside the machinery of the brain and see how trust and belonging are built. Along the way, we’ll see that being smart is overrated, that showing fallibility is crucial, and that being nice is not nearly as important as you might think. Above all, we’ll see how leaders of high-performing cultures navigate the challenges of achieving excellence in a fast-changing world. While successful culture can look and feel like magic, the truth is that   t’s not. Culture is a set of living relationships working toward a shared goal . It’s not something you are.  It’s something you do.

* I chose groups using the following qualifications: (1) they had performed in the top 1 percent of their domain for at least a decade (where applicable);
(2) they had succeeded with a range of different personnel; (3) their culture had been admired by knowledgeable people across their industry and be- yond. To help guard against selection bias, I also looked at many cultures that weren’t so successful (see page 40 for an example).

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.
UP NEXT
CANCEL
00:00
-00:00
Shop
Text Message
Email
Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp
Pinterest
Share
More videos
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
3,395 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

trefrog66
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s good but I have questions
Reviewed in the United States on November 19, 2018
Overall I loved this book. But several of the corporate cultures he writes about as being positive have since had sexual misconduct issues, or in some cases no women or few women to include in the cultures. I think it would make for an excellent follow up to examine how... See more
Overall I loved this book. But several of the corporate cultures he writes about as being positive have since had sexual misconduct issues, or in some cases no women or few women to include in the cultures. I think it would make for an excellent follow up to examine how women and non-binary persons are accepted into the workplace using the advice in this book. Or how to alter corporate culture to empower all people.

I reached out to Daniel in the hopes that he had some thoughts. I haven''t gotten a response, but here is what I said as it applies to the book:

Hello Daniel!

I just finished reading The Culture Code and I really enjoyed it. I''m a photographer and lots of your research connected to my own about putting clients at ease and communicating that failure is ok.

However, I did have one thought that I hoped you''d be able to offer some additional insight into. Some of the cultures you researched had/have issues with toxic masculinity. I was an improvisor in Chicago for over 10 years, and in many ways the trust used to build strong groups was also used as a vehicle to groom young women to trust terrible men. Similarly, John Lasseter stepped down as head of Pixar amid misconduct allegations. And the Navy SEALs still haven''t had a women in the squad.

My question is, when strong culture comes from expressing safety and vulnerability, how can these institutions be viewed as strong when women''s experiences have been so different? And in your research had you noticed any ways that other companies had dealt with toxic masculinity?
229 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Wally Bock
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Great book with helpful insights, but there''s a glitch or two
Reviewed in the United States on April 24, 2018
There are a lot of books about culture and how to create a strong and healthy one. Daniel Coyle knew that a strong and effective culture is part of the secret sauce of successful organizations. He knew that “A strong culture increases net income 756 percent over 11 years,... See more
There are a lot of books about culture and how to create a strong and healthy one. Daniel Coyle knew that a strong and effective culture is part of the secret sauce of successful organizations. He knew that “A strong culture increases net income 756 percent over 11 years, according to a Harvard study of more than 200 companies.” He thought he could look at strong cultures in a different way and write a book about it. Here’s how he puts it.

“I spent the last four years visiting and researching eight of the world’s most successful groups, including a special-ops military unit, an inner-city school, a professional basketball team, a movie studio, a comedy troupe, a gang of jewel thieves, and others. I found that their cultures are created by a specific set of skills”

Coyle started with a definition of culture that’s a little bit different than the norm. He says, “Culture is a set of living relationships working toward a shared goal. It’s not something you are, it’s something you do.”

So, what is it that you do? What do people in organizations that create strong cultures do that their peers in other organizations don’t do?

Coyle organizes the book into three sections, each one of which relates to a specific skillset. The three skills are: build safety; share vulnerability; and establish purpose.

There are several chapters about each skill. There’s a good mix of stories and studies. Coyle chooses his examples carefully and tells their stories well. He doesn’t use bullet points or frequent summaries, so sometimes you will work to tease out his meaning. You can get a sense of this if you review my highlights from the Culture Code on Goodreads.

Most business authors put summaries of key points or action steps at the end of every chapter. Coyle doesn’t. Instead, he includes a chapter at the end of every section, titled “Ideas for Action.” That chapter functions as a review of the other chapters in the section. I think that’s a good device, but I’d rather he also put his key points at the end of every chapter.

Coyle’s a good storyteller and he makes it a point to try to tell stories you may have heard before from an angle where you haven’t seen them before. One of those stories is the story about Tylenol and its credo. Another is the story of the founding of Pixar.

In telling those stories, Coyle leaves out some interesting and potentially helpful things. For example, he tells us about the meeting where Johnson & Johnson executives reviewed the company’s credo to see if it should be revised. We know there was a meeting. But Coyle never tells us whether they changed the credo or not at that meeting. He simply jumps ahead to the Tylenol crisis, where the credo became guiding principles for one of the most successful disaster recovery examples ever.

Then, there’s the story of Ed Catmull and Pixar. Coyle says, “If you set out to design a life that represented the perfect merger of art and science, you might design one that looks like Catmull’s.” Then, just below, after mentioning a little bit about Catmull’s parents and his early interests, he says “After college, he landed a job with George Lucas…”

Well yes, it was, technically, “after college,” but it was a full five years after Catmull got his PhD. And, after talking about the life as a model for the perfect merger of art and science, Coyle leaves out the fact that in his pre-Lucas and pre-Pixar days, Ed Catmull worked on projects for ARPA during the time he was working as a physicist.

Those are important things to know if you want to learn how Ed Catmull developed into the manager he is today. You can learn more about them in his book, Creativity, Inc, about his life and Pixar.

Special Note

Chapters 15 and 16 are worth reading, even if you skip everything else. Chapter 15 is “How to Lead for Proficiency” while chapter 16 is “How to Lead for Creativity.” The two skills are different and which one you choose as a manager will determine what values you treasure and what kinds of performance you optimize.

In A Nutshell

This is a book that will help you create a strong and supportive culture where you are. There are problems with the book, but they’re not big enough or consistent enough to really detract from the value. If you want to learn about how to create and maintain a positive and strong culture in your team or organization, buy and read The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups by Daniel Coyle.
260 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Steve Gladis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Culture Equation: C = S + V + P
Reviewed in the United States on April 17, 2018
Strong cultures make teams work better and produce higher profits—according to a Harvard study, about 7% more a year. A healthy culture—one which protects the organization—is comprised of three critical elements: Safety, Vulnerability, and Purpose. In his well-written book,... See more
Strong cultures make teams work better and produce higher profits—according to a Harvard study, about 7% more a year. A healthy culture—one which protects the organization—is comprised of three critical elements: Safety, Vulnerability, and Purpose. In his well-written book, Daniel Coyle outlines a Maslow-derived model that starts with safety: You get the most honest responses and best effort from people when they feel safe and connected to a team. As a leader, you create a safe environment by listening, thanking people, helping people to interact, getting rid of bad apples, and by giving all people a voice. Next, vulnerability starts with the leader admitting flaws, thus making it easier for others to admit theirs. “I need your help,” becomes the message when leaders are vulnerable. And an attitude of “we can do this thing together” results. Many stellar organizations have their own versions of this vulnerability tenet that makes them stronger. Practice vulnerability by the leader: Going first, communicating expectations, delivering negative feedback in person, listening well, aiming for candor not brutal honesty, and embracing discomfort. Finally, purpose completes the culture code (Safety—Vulnerability—Purpose). Purpose-driven questions are “What is this all about and why are we doing what we do?” Purpose is about the higher calling of work—not about the what or the how of work, rather about the why of it. Establish purpose by developing and enforcing priorities—especially in group relationships. Also, support proficiency and creativity separately but equally, develop memorable culture slogans, measure what matters most, develop symbols (artifacts) of culture, and set the behavior bar high and with specific, defined actions.
80 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Dave
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Actionable Steps to Change Culture
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2018
If you liked Good to Great this book is for you. If you want to create a high performance culture Daniel Coyle gives you plenty of examples of successful business cultures, failed cultures and why they failed. His examples are punctuated with the source documents... See more
If you liked Good to Great this book is for you. If you want to create a high performance culture Daniel Coyle gives you plenty of examples of successful business cultures, failed cultures and why they failed. His examples are punctuated with the source documents successful cultures use. He also shows you how and why creative cultures, for example Pixar, require a different cultural design than a service company such as Zappos. This, in all of the business books I''ve read, was new. Definitely worth a read.
50 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
CC Coach Mike
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Guide To Building Success
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2018
Dan Coyle’s The Culture Code is a deep dive into what is it that makes successful groups. Like The Talent Code, this book helps us understand what separates the ordinary from the extraordinary. He offers practical suggestions about strategies to use these tools in your own... See more
Dan Coyle’s The Culture Code is a deep dive into what is it that makes successful groups. Like The Talent Code, this book helps us understand what separates the ordinary from the extraordinary. He offers practical suggestions about strategies to use these tools in your own situations. I have the feeling I will be rereading this one a lot! This is a MUST READ!!
22 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
V. Vanderbent
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating yet a bit too optimistic
Reviewed in the United States on December 27, 2018
I found a great deal of value in this book about the culture in organizations with a few caveats. As I did my best to imagine how some of the methods described would fit in the organizations I have been involved with, I couldn’t help but think that for at least some of the... See more
I found a great deal of value in this book about the culture in organizations with a few caveats. As I did my best to imagine how some of the methods described would fit in the organizations I have been involved with, I couldn’t help but think that for at least some of the examples the context must have been instrumental in providing a fertile breeding ground for a constructive culture. I am thinking about military type organizations in particular where the line of authority is well established and not easily changed or broken.

In another instance, I found it peculiar that the author compliments the management style at Pixar while conveniently omitting that an important part of the workforce (the software programmers who created the computer code of the movies that the design/creative team took all the credit for) was initially completely overlooked in creating the culture Pixar is so well known for. In other words, lots of praise but lacking in a 100% realistic assessment of what went wrong initially and how it was fixed. Including this part of Pixar’s history would have made Culture Code a more realistic guide on organizational culture for me.
9 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
BOOM
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Safety, Vulnerability, Purpose
Reviewed in the United States on March 9, 2018
I finished The Talent Code a week ago and enjoyed it so much that I decided to read The Culture Code. His findings on the significance of Building Safety, Sharing Vunerability, and Establishing Purpose caused me to rethink my own leadership style. I highlighted so many... See more
I finished The Talent Code a week ago and enjoyed it so much that I decided to read The Culture Code. His findings on the significance of Building Safety, Sharing Vunerability, and Establishing Purpose caused me to rethink my own leadership style. I highlighted so many passsages that I’m looking forward to going back through the book to refresh myself on key points.

The insights from his research reminded me of these other great books I’ve read recently:
Turn The Ship Around by L. David Marquet
American Icon by Bryce G. Hoffman
Team of Teams by General Stanley McChrystal
The Captain Class by Sam Walker
6 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A struggling read
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2019
It strikes me as odd this book has so many 5-star reviews. Out of all leadership books I have read in my entire life (quite a few), this has been by-far the most boring I have ever read. The way the author attempts to lay out his arguments lacks cohesion, paragraph after... See more
It strikes me as odd this book has so many 5-star reviews. Out of all leadership books I have read in my entire life (quite a few), this has been by-far the most boring I have ever read. The way the author attempts to lay out his arguments lacks cohesion, paragraph after paragraph I found myself resisting the urge to fall asleep or busy myself with some other activity. Adds very little value even to a someone considered a beginner in the leadership field. I did put it down after a couple of hours reading.
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

markr
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
easy reading about leadership - told in real life anecdotes
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 21, 2018
I was little disappointed by this book. If you not read many books about leadership, then this would be a really good place to start. It is easy reading, and the points are made through real life examples and stories rather than theory, The disappointment for me is there...See more
I was little disappointed by this book. If you not read many books about leadership, then this would be a really good place to start. It is easy reading, and the points are made through real life examples and stories rather than theory, The disappointment for me is there was very little here that can''t be found elsewhere, but if you are new to all of this then it would make a really good introduction - so much of the work of team building seems counter intuitive at first, and this book covers that well
11 people found this helpful
Report
kat j
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What was best was how actions and behaviours were clearly illustrated that ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 12, 2018
Fab book. Really interesting little anecdotes that illustrate quite complex theory and psychology. What was best was how actions and behaviours were clearly illustrated that could be applied by any individual committed enough to try. Have shared with my entire leadership...See more
Fab book. Really interesting little anecdotes that illustrate quite complex theory and psychology. What was best was how actions and behaviours were clearly illustrated that could be applied by any individual committed enough to try. Have shared with my entire leadership team and it has had a profoundly positive effect on our business. Would definitely recommend. Writing style had a lovely tone and wasn''t all about the writer. Buy it.
12 people found this helpful
Report
Pads
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An all time great of the performance literature realm
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 7, 2019
If you work in a team, but especially if you lead one, this book is not good; it is absolutely fantastic. This ranks as one of the most important learning resources in existence in terms of group performance. Buy this book now, immediately read it five times, implement...See more
If you work in a team, but especially if you lead one, this book is not good; it is absolutely fantastic. This ranks as one of the most important learning resources in existence in terms of group performance. Buy this book now, immediately read it five times, implement everything in it and watch your culture become the primary driver of results in your business or team. Then buy Talent Code, another game changer from this author, and repeat the process. The best thing about this book is that the principles within it have a cumulative effect; the more you implement, the more often they are repeated and the longer they remain in place, the more acute and sustainable the positive results. Whether you are running a FTSE100 business, or coaching a Sunday League football team, you must read this book.
6 people found this helpful
Report
Jules
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 3, 2020
A fascinating insight into what can be achieved when minds are in harness and committed to delivering above-and-beyond results. Lots of examples, case studies and creative thinking here - this is a must for anyone working in a team or looking to encourage people to achieve...See more
A fascinating insight into what can be achieved when minds are in harness and committed to delivering above-and-beyond results. Lots of examples, case studies and creative thinking here - this is a must for anyone working in a team or looking to encourage people to achieve their true potential. An easy to engage with book, clearly written and with lots of inspirational pointers. A great read.
One person found this helpful
Report
Brododendron
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Inspiring read with easily actionable points
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 13, 2018
This is an inspirational read and a call-to-action for any team looking to be more successful. The book takes examples from the best teams on the planet including Pixar, The Navy Seals and the airline industry and draws lessons from these into inspiring but actionable...See more
This is an inspirational read and a call-to-action for any team looking to be more successful. The book takes examples from the best teams on the planet including Pixar, The Navy Seals and the airline industry and draws lessons from these into inspiring but actionable points that can be implemented in your own team. I will be using this as a reference from time-to-time to help cultivate my own team''s growth.
5 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • bantam books
  • Design Textbooks
  • Best group dynamics for teams
  • Writing Tools

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online

The sale Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly outlet sale Successful Groups online