The Silkworm (A Cormoran popular online Strike Novel, 2) sale

The Silkworm (A Cormoran popular online Strike Novel, 2) sale

The Silkworm (A Cormoran popular online Strike Novel, 2) sale
The Silkworm (A Cormoran popular online Strike Novel, 2) sale__front

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In this "wonderfully entertaining" mystery (Harlan Coben, The New York Times Book Review), private investigator Cormoran Strike must track down a missing writer -- and a sinister killer bent on destruction.

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days -- as he has done before -- and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, he discovers that Quine''s disappearance is no coincidence. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were published, it would ruin lives -- meaning that almost everyone in his life would have motives to silence him.

When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, Strike must race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any he has encountered before . . .

A compulsively readable crime novel with twists at every turn, The Silkworm is the second in J. K. Rowling''s highly acclaimed series featuring Cormoran Strike and his determined young assistant, Robin Ellacott.

Review

"Strike shares a trait with many great fictional detectives: He is darn good company... The Silkworm is a very well-written, wonderfully entertaining take on the traditional British crime novel...Robert Galbraith may proudly join the ranks of English, Scottish and Irish crime writers such as Tana French, Ian Rankin, Val McDermid, John Connolly, Kate Atkinson and Peter Robinson."― Harlan Coben, The New York Times Book Review

"Cormoran Strike is back, and so is his resourceful sidekick, Robin Ellacott, a gumshoe team that''s on its way to becoming as celebrated for its mystery-solving skills as Nick and Nora Charles of "Thin Man" fame, and Mikael Blomkvist and Lisbeth Salander (a.k.a. the girl with the dragon tattoo)."― Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"The plot zings along...Swift and satisfying"― Carolyn Kellogg, The Los Angeles Times

"''The last line of The Silkworm, which will lift the hearts of readers who have come to love its deeply sympathetic characters, offers the prospect of more of that joy both for her and for us."― Charles Finch, USA Today (3.5/4 stars)

"A compulsively entertaining yarn."― Thom Geier, Entertainment Weekly

"Robert Galbraith... has written a second absorbing whodunit starring detective Corcmoran Strike to follow last year''s stealth hit, The Cuckoo''s Calling.... Astutely observed, well-paced... The Silkworm thoroughly engages as a crime novel."― Sue Corbett, People

The Silkworm is fast-paced and entertaining... Strike is heroic without intending to be and has a great back story. He''s the illegitimate son of a rock star whose half-siblings grew up in privilege... And he''s brooding, but not annoyingly so. Strike has all kinds of potential. It''d be a crime not to keep up with him."― Sherryl Connelly, Daily News

"Why is "likable" the first word that comes to mind upon finishing The Silkworm? Surely, that has something to do with Rowling''s palpable pleasure in her newly chosen genre (the jig may be up with her Robert Galbraith pseudonym, but the bloom is still on her homicidal rose) and even more to do with her detective hero, who, at the risk of offending, is the second husband of every author''s dreams."― Louis Bayard, The Washington Post

"The story is enthralling, not only for its twists and turns, but for the fun of the teamwork.... [It''s] a cast of characters who you''ll want to meet again and again."― Ashley Ross, Time

"[ The Silkworm is a] swift-paced, suspenseful mystery....Robert Galbraith has announced himself a fresh voice in mystery fiction: part hard-boiled, part satiric, part poignant, and part romantic."― Tom Nolan, The Wall Street Journal

"Bring on the next one, please....Galbraith writes with wit and affection for detective-novel tradition (it''s impossible not to see her central duo as a modern-day Nick and Nora, minus the marriage), and races us through a twisty plot so smoothly that you won''t notice as the hours tick by."― Moira MacDonald, The Seattle Times

"Having just the better part of a day and a night making my way through the 455 pages of The Silkworm ... I must say, I don''t mind at all... The murder mystery at the heart of The Silkworm is a genuine mystery with an altogether satisfying resolution." ― Malcolm Jones, The Daily Beast

About the Author

Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series and The Casual Vacancy.

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4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Josh Mauthe
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The plot is decent, but the character work is rich and enjoyable, and the storytelling is addictive
Reviewed in the United States on April 23, 2018
It’s somewhat surprising that publishers have allowed The Silkworm to continue to be listed under the name Robert Galbraith instead of J.K. Rowling – after all, this is an industry where female writers are often asked to abbreviate their names so that sales don’t get... See more
It’s somewhat surprising that publishers have allowed The Silkworm to continue to be listed under the name Robert Galbraith instead of J.K. Rowling – after all, this is an industry where female writers are often asked to abbreviate their names so that sales don’t get affected, so I can’t imagine that leaving Rowling’s name off is appealing to them. And yet, in a lot of ways, it’s completely appropriate – the Galbraith books don’t feel like the public assumptions of what J.K. Rowling writes. They’re private detective books with a little dose of hard-boiled mixed in – they’re occasionally violent (even graphically so, in the case of The Silkworm), suspenseful, and full of shady characters.

Even so, much like that more famous other series she wrote, the joy here isn’t always so much the plot as it is the rich characterization and general gift for storytelling. In creating the jaded war veteran Cormoran Strike and his Girl Friday Robin Ellacott, Rowling’s come up with two outstanding characters that have a way of pulling you along even as the plotting occasionally gets bewildering in the way so many mysteries do. After all, The Silkworm is full of absurd touches, red herrings, colorful characters, and elaborate plot ideas, not the least of which is the central hook – the absolutely brutal and graphic killing of a notorious author that seems to have been inspired by his unpublished manuscript, which mocked and ridiculed pretty much everyone in his life and in the publishing industry.

The result is a pretty solid detective novel that scratches all the right itches for the genre – tense interviews with reluctant witnesses and suspects, power plays, bluffs to draw out the villains, covert surveillance, lots of red herrings, and secrets galore. If you know the genre, you know what you’re getting, and it’s no small thing to say that Rowling generally does it incredibly well. The Silkworm feels silly at times, especially when you try to put it all together – and that’s especially true with the answers of who did it and why – but none of that keeps it from being an incredibly entertaining and gripping read, nor does it stop it from being a really great piece of detective fiction (one that feels different enough from Rowling’s other writings to merit the pseudonym).

But the real treat here is the character work, which gives The Silkworm the investment you need in a good detective story. The contrast between cynical, world-weary, literally walking wounded Cormoran Strike and his hopeful, eager, earnest secretary / assistant / trainee Robin Ellacott is easy and obvious, but Rowling makes it work incredibly well, bringing both characters to rich life and letting their friendship and mutual respect speak volumes. It’s a great central dynamic to the book, and the way Rowling plays with it – and the tensions between them – and uses them to supplement her labyrinthine (but engaging) mystery is what makes The Silkworm so satisfying. That Rowling got so pigeonholed that she felt like she couldn’t write the Cormoran Strike books under her own name is a bit sad; that she’s writing them, though, and that there are more to come? That’s very welcome news indeed, because if they’re all this fun and captivating, well, I won’t be complaining.
38 people found this helpful
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Michael Haywood
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Comes to a grinding halt halfway through
Reviewed in the United States on April 3, 2017
My biggest issue with the first Strike book was that it was too long and too slow. The second Strike book fixed one of those issues. Being 100 pages shorter really helped with the pacing early on but nearly halfway through, The book comes to a grinding halt and becomes... See more
My biggest issue with the first Strike book was that it was too long and too slow. The second Strike book fixed one of those issues. Being 100 pages shorter really helped with the pacing early on but nearly halfway through, The book comes to a grinding halt and becomes another slow and tough to finish read. This isn''t an insult to the characters or the plot. It just gets boring and it''s tough to read more than a few pages at a time before getting sick of it.

I do love how Rowling gave Strike and Robin much more development in this book. A good chunk of the book is about their relationship and Robin wanting to be more than a simple assistant. We also see more backstory about the two characters'' past and social lives. The plot was kind of predictable, Not to the point where you knew what was gonna happen but it was pretty easy to eliminate a good handful of suspects early on. A few typical mystery novel tropes are followed but again that doesn''t stop it from being interesting plot wise.

Overall, It''s not a terrible book. If you could finish the first then you should have no issue finishing this one. It''s not for everybody though. IDK why but Rowling''s pacing issue always hits her half way into the book and it just ruins it a bit.
26 people found this helpful
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Well-Read Woman
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
IT WOULD GOOD, IF PARTS WEREN’T SO BAD
Reviewed in the United States on October 10, 2020
I gave the first book in this series a scathing review, and this one wasn’t much better, but reading it allowed me to realize exactly what annoys me so much about this series: it would be good if there weren’t small portions that make you cringe. I am eternally... See more
I gave the first book in this series a scathing review, and this one wasn’t much better, but reading it allowed me to realize exactly what annoys me so much about this series: it would be good if there weren’t small portions that make you cringe. I am eternally flabbergasted that this series is written by JK Rowling (under a pen name) because she is an experienced author and the mistakes in these books are very amateur. Similar to the first book, a little editing would have gone a long way. A reduction in word-count and faster pacing would have elevated this from “okay” to “good.” It builds slowly, and similar to the first book, it is about 400 pages of the detective walking around (or limping, more accurately) and drinking beer and talking to people. The reveal at the end (ala Agatha Christie) really just serves to prove Rowling is... not Christie. All of this was very similar to the first book, so I’d you liked that one then you will like this one, and if you didn’t then don’t waste your time expecting this one to be better.
Lastly, and this drove me CRAZY about the first book too, there is an underlying misogyny throughout (not just in regards to the detective’s viewpoint, but in the portrayal and view of women throughout the series. I am ASTOUNDED this was written by a woman...). In the first book, the female character’s greatest contribution was wearing a sexy dress. This time it is driving a car. Yep. She can drive. Drive well, actually. *Cue collective inhale of astonishment*
Ugh. It’s the small things like that which ruin this otherwise so-so, slow series.
5 people found this helpful
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Sandra Iler Kirkland
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
As Delightful As The First Comoran Strike Book
Reviewed in the United States on July 13, 2016
Novelist Owen Quine has gone missing. His wife comes to detective Comoran Strike. She wants Comoran to find him and bring him home. Quine goes away periodically, but always returns and this time he hasn''t. They have a daughter with special needs and Quine knows only he... See more
Novelist Owen Quine has gone missing. His wife comes to detective Comoran Strike. She wants Comoran to find him and bring him home. Quine goes away periodically, but always returns and this time he hasn''t. They have a daughter with special needs and Quine knows only he can produce the money needed to keep the family afloat.

Strike takes the case and expects it to be an easy one. But as he investigates, it becomes more complicated. Quine has written a new novel, one in which he skewers many of the literary circle of England. He has a mistress who is sure he is leaving his wife and child to be with her, an agent who seems to despise him and a publishing house that would be more than glad to drop him. Every individual thinly disguised in the book would be glad to see him disappear for good. When Strike discovers Quine''s body and realizes that he has been killed in a parody of the novel, the race is on to discover the murderer.

The reader also learns more about the personal lives of Strike and his assistant, Robin Ellacott. Strike is a former soldier who has been left with an artificial leg and investigative skills from his time in the military. Huge and focused, he is considered without social skills yet has friends in every circle who would do anything for him. Robin, his assistant, is about to get married and starting to wonder if that is the right course for her, or if it would be more fulfilling to become an investigator herself. Together the two work through the lengthy suspect list to discover who killed Quine.

This is the second Comoran Strike book and it is equally as delightful as the first. In the worst-kept secret in the literary world, Robert Galbraith is the pseudonym of J.K. Rowling, and she delivers the plotting and characterization that made her famous as an author. The reader finishes the book eager to read the next installment in the series. This book is recommended for mystery readers.
22 people found this helpful
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DAE
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Silkworm worn out.
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2018
This second book was disappointing. A third of the book could have been edited out to make a much tighter better read. What worked for me in book one, failed to work in book two. The rumination, explanation, and digression were irritatingly bothersome. They Interrupted... See more
This second book was disappointing. A third of the book could have been edited out to make a much tighter better read. What worked for me in book one, failed to work in book two. The rumination, explanation, and digression were irritatingly bothersome. They Interrupted the plot progression and it''s many threads. It really didn''t build anything to Strikes character. Rather the reverse. It tells us Strike has many friends, and he can call in favors, but in the two books he has done nothing much with the said friends. Gives nothing of himself. Doesn''t enjoy their company. He finds their children irritating. The inverse is true of Robin. She grew as a character through the rumination and digressions. You believe she wants to be a detective and will succeed.

The murder seemed to come in second like the ignored stepchild. The angst of Strikes tortured lover marrying another man ate up all the oxygen in a third of the book. Torture to read. Seemed repetitive because you knew the out come from the beginning

Will I read the third book. It is a 50/50 split between like and dislike. Maybe with time.
7 people found this helpful
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Anne C.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Super creepy and great characterization.
Reviewed in the United States on May 2, 2019
The plotting and characterization in The Silkworm were of the same style as the previous installment in this series, and that means that they were excellent. The style is the same, also: slow burn with a rising action and a great denouement. I loved the mystery... See more
The plotting and characterization in The Silkworm were of the same style as the previous installment in this series, and that means that they were excellent. The style is the same, also: slow burn with a rising action and a great denouement.

I loved the mystery itself, and again failed to figure out who the killer was before Strike. He''s just that good, I guess. And I really, really want to read (view spoiler)Bombyx Mori. Just to see what all the fuss is about.

I still really, really like Strike and Robin and their calm camaraderie. I like watching them interact with each other, although I still read in fear that they will end up together and ruin everything. I''m pretty sure this series would jump the shark at that point, but I could be wrong. J.K. can make anything work, I guess.

I still hate Matthew, as I''m sure we''re all meant to. He''s just...ugh. Get a clue, Robin.

There were only a few little things that made this less satisfying than Cuckoo, and it''s hard to describe them. The ending, the "solve," just wasn''t as neat or as precise, and I didn''t understand the "why" as much this time, either.

I didn''t like the way Strike treated Nina at all. It wasn''t like his liaison in the first book; he treated Nina rather poorly, in my opinion. But I did like this book a lot more than some mysteries I''ve put myself through lately, regardless.

I''m waiting for the paperback to come out to read Career of Evil , just so it will match my copies of the first two books, but I''m so looking forward to it.

TL;DR: These books are some of the most carefully plotted and beautifully written I''ve read in a while. The characterization ain''t shabby, either. Check them out, for sure.
4 people found this helpful
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Waterside Lucy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Drury. Everything and everyone is drury. And, find a damn prosthetist already!
Reviewed in the United States on February 1, 2019
I suspected who the killer was right away. I was right. It didn’t take away from the story. However, Strike could be a bit more likeable. Robin could be a little less subservient. The author could eliminate half the suspects. The bloody leg could heal. And the... See more
I suspected who the killer was right away. I was right. It didn’t take away from the story. However, Strike could be a bit more likeable. Robin could be a little less subservient. The author could eliminate half the suspects. The bloody leg could heal. And the weather could be nice at least a few days. Other than that, I like the way she tells a story and makes you part of the scene. I don’t suppose these two knuckleheads will ever get together, admit their true feelings, find another couple whose company Strike can tolerate, find a comfortable house and a competent prosthetist, and move to a climate with some sunshine. Drury is the backdrop to just about everything. Yet, I really did like the damn book. On to number 3! (But this time I’m writing down who everyone is.)
5 people found this helpful
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SassyPants
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A twisty mystery
Reviewed in the United States on October 14, 2018
This is the second in the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith aka J. K. Rowling. This is a solid murder mystery with a lot of twists and turns. It does seem to follow the basic formula of mystery series. Murder, suspects, a flawed detective or police person as the... See more
This is the second in the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith aka J. K. Rowling. This is a solid murder mystery with a lot of twists and turns. It does seem to follow the basic formula of mystery series. Murder, suspects, a flawed detective or police person as the lead, and each book gives more insight into the main character’s past. Nothing wrong with that, it works and makes for a compelling read. This book reminded me a bit of Magpie Murders. Rather, since this was published first, Magpie Murders borrows from The Silkworm.

Author Owen Quine goes missing and his dowdy wife hires Cormoran Strike to find him. He has written a bizarre and twisted novel featuring many of his “friends” and associates thinly disguised and in compromising positions. Quine is a serial adulterer and a basically unlikeable human. Thus, many motives to get rid of him. He is found dead in a scene and condition recreated from his yet unpublished final book. Thankfully, unlike in Magpie, there is not a book within a book. From the description of Quine’s book, it would be both uncomfortable and painful to read. Cormoran is aided in his investigation by his comely young assistant Robin Ellacott. Of course there are some hints of sexual tension there, though she is engaged to another.

This is a very enjoyable mystery that will leave you guessing to the end. It is a long book with many characters and details. I was able to read big chunks of this at a time, which made it easier to follow. I give Ms. Rowling a lot of credit for being able to write a series like Harry Potter and then something completely different like Cormoran Strike. To me, that speaks to great talent. I also read Cuckoo’s Calling a few years ago. I liked Silkworm well enough to read the next book in the series, Career of Evil.
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Top reviews from other countries

NotTreadingGrapes
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lost the will to live with this
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 22, 2020
Somebody get this woman an editor. Unpleasant and unbelievable characters and a vaguely murky setting that almost has you thinking you''re reading some fantasy world story. I started skim-reading at 85% (Kindle) in a desperate attempt to get it finished, no longer caring who...See more
Somebody get this woman an editor. Unpleasant and unbelievable characters and a vaguely murky setting that almost has you thinking you''re reading some fantasy world story. I started skim-reading at 85% (Kindle) in a desperate attempt to get it finished, no longer caring who had done it, or why. Too many characters and the "literary" device of character A telling the reader via a long-winded conversation with Strike what the writer wants us to know about character B (very little by the end, I just wanted them out of my life) is tedious and very Creative Writing Lesson 1 for such an accomplished writer. In any case, that''s me done with Robert Galbraith. The first one was OK, this was like wading through treacle.
10 people found this helpful
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Leigh
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The 2nd Strike Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 11, 2018
This book is the second book of the Cormoran Strike novels and is written in much the same way, with the chapters alternating between P.I Cormoran and his assistant Robin. The style of writing is much the same as the HP series and as I said in my review for the first book...See more
This book is the second book of the Cormoran Strike novels and is written in much the same way, with the chapters alternating between P.I Cormoran and his assistant Robin. The style of writing is much the same as the HP series and as I said in my review for the first book in the series, Cuckoo''s Calling, I don''t think it works. It makes the writing style awkward and hard to read I feel, I struggled with it at times. Once again the story focuses on Cormoran Strike as he investigates a murder. This time Owen Quine author has been murdered in the same way one of his characters was murdered in his new manuscript. We then follow Strike as he investigates the murder, Quine it doesn''t seem is short of enemies and there appears to be hidden clues in the manuscript. I found the book odd. Dislike is too strong of a word for how I feel about this book. But there were many things about this book that I didn''t like; the snide almost nasty way I felt the author described the press and the "famous" people in the first book are here too with the added bonus of there appearing to be a complete dislike of the literary world. The snippets of the manuscript that we got to read through Robin reading it, were very strange, they were very wacky and confusing and I didn''t feel added anything to the plot at all. I do thing the author has done a good job with the characterisation of Strike and he is intriguing, but he seems to be the only character who has any real depth to them. The story is also well paced, but is quite predictable in places. Of course I might be one of the few that are not overly fond of these books, but they just didn''t gel with me. I don''t think I will be reading any more in the series, there was more about this book that disliked than I liked and to me, that usually means it’s time to stop reading in a series. So I won''t continue reading.
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Jippu
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Depressingly bad
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2020
I am a fan of Harry Potter. But Cormoran Strike! Why did J K Rowling want to write about a grubby, one legged detective, who has definitely chosen a wrong profession, trying to shadow unfaithful wives or husbands (nobody will miss a big man with only one leg), who often...See more
I am a fan of Harry Potter. But Cormoran Strike! Why did J K Rowling want to write about a grubby, one legged detective, who has definitely chosen a wrong profession, trying to shadow unfaithful wives or husbands (nobody will miss a big man with only one leg), who often behaves like a child (works in potter books but not here) has a young female admirer attracted inexplicably to him who also behaves like a teenager, and is in horrible pain for most of the time. Why not a competent woman who succeeds against difficult enemies? And the plot: an unreadable book which is supposed to be libellous against the murdered author''s colleagues but where the characters are so surreal that there is surely no risk that they could have sued the author. The only concrete thing is that the author describes his own, extremely complicated murder in the book and then is promptly killed in precisely this, totally impossible way. Almost all characters except the female admirers of Cormoran Strike are highly unpleasant or unsympathetic. The plot is extremely convoluted and improbable. The writing is bad, with even some errors a competent editor should have corrected. Interestingly, many readers seem to think that this is the best book of the Cormoran Strike series. Would not dream to try another!
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
) I''ve spent happy hours trying to untangle the clues
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 14, 2017
I''m very late to the Strike novels and now I''m an addict. I was quickly immersed in the narrative - more gruesome and nightmarish than ''The Cuckoo''s Calling'' - and thoroughly invested in Strike and Robin. (Leave Matthew, Robin, for heaven''s sake.) I''ve spent happy hours...See more
I''m very late to the Strike novels and now I''m an addict. I was quickly immersed in the narrative - more gruesome and nightmarish than ''The Cuckoo''s Calling'' - and thoroughly invested in Strike and Robin. (Leave Matthew, Robin, for heaven''s sake.) I''ve spent happy hours trying to untangle the clues, literal, figurative and linguistic, engaged and frustrated as the author has played me like a fish. I''m already binge reading the next one, with my hair standing on end. I can''t wait for ''Lethal White''. Entertaining, puzzling, funny and frightening - can I call something grisly a treat?
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DGol
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very good, unputdownable mystery thriller
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 16, 2021
I thought The Silkworm was a gruesome (and in places downright unpalatable), but competent thriller. I found Strike and Robin more developed as characters (more so than they were in Cuckoo’s), and it was good that they are shown with flaws and a shared theme of having...See more
I thought The Silkworm was a gruesome (and in places downright unpalatable), but competent thriller. I found Strike and Robin more developed as characters (more so than they were in Cuckoo’s), and it was good that they are shown with flaws and a shared theme of having terrible tastes when it comes to romantic partners. While Strike is pretty much a wreck (is that quite appealing in some men, do you think?), Robin is good-looking, highly intelligent, capable, and someone who reveals ‘hidden talents’. Although, in every way, insufferable like the know-it-all, Hermione. Other depictions of women in the book were considerably less flattering, elevating Robin’s status further. I don’t know if this was intentional, but I felt like HP and Ron rolling their eyes while Hermione patronised, or condescended to them. The saving grace is I do love reading about London, and can follow the characters on their journeys with ease and nostalgic delight. This above all are some of my more favourite parts of these books. Warts and all - having to go past gangs of youth and not quite making your train etc., well, in the days before the virus. All the characters in this book, to certain degrees, are treated sympathetically and they are essentially not wholly good or evil. This does help keep things believable, and the less believable bits are down to luck or serendipitous events. Sometimes detectives need to get lucky (in the words of Columbo), which happens here. Another thing, the unravelling of plots and themes happens a bit too quickly in places, because a couple of times it was difficult to follow Strike’s train of thought, and I found myself reading back the last couple of pages to see anything I might’ve missed the first time round. The author demands complete attention from the reader and presses on whether the reader can catch up or not. Perhaps, in doing so, some readers will just give up on the somewhat convoluted narrative. However, the main lead is not typically handsome, a traumatised veteran and disabled. Yet he overcomes daily pain to focus on his tasks. I can relate to this in terms of dealing with and managing daily pain, but still having to make a living. Strike’s work is not at all glamorous in some places, when stalking unfaithful spouses. I wonder if the editor could’ve been a bit more heavy-handed and removed a couple of these segues into irrelevant events. I do get, however, that the author wanted to show the more unglamorous side of private detective work. This could have been covered in a couple of pages, not several. The other characters are ambiguous and sometimes like ghastly caricatures, which reminded me of Roald Dahl’s style. This does make for compelling reading and despite my irritation of not being able to follow or understand Strike in places, I found myself getting absorbed into this thrilling tale. The real question though: is Robin really Top Gear’s ‘Stig’?!
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